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Supreme victory! Top court backs Trump’s asylum rules change for now

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Supreme victory Top court backs Trumps asylum rules change for now

The fight to slow the flow of asylum-seeking migrants (and the criminal illegal aliens who often hide in their midst) gained access to a much-needed rules change Wednesday as the Supreme Court ruled against an injunction placed on the President’s asylum policy. With only two dissenters, Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayer, this opens the door for the rule to be applied across the nation.

This is temporary, for now. Lifting the injunction does not make the rule permanent. It only allows the rule to stand while the court hears the whole case against it.

With this rule, asylum seekers can be denied instantly if they did not apply for asylum in the countries through which they traveled to get to the United States. This means nearly everyone from Central America, Africa, or anywhere else who went through Mexico to get to the United States can be denied asylum on the spot if they cannot demonstrate they first applied for asylum in Mexico and were denied.

Mexicans seeking asylum will not be affected by this rule.

The goal of the rule is to close the gap between initial screenings and hearings. Without the rule, the vast majority of those seeking asylum are granted access to a subsequent hearing. But most do not show up for this hearing and those who do are regularly denied because they are mostly economic migrants. Poverty is not a valid reason for granting asylum under U.S. and most international laws.

Asylum-seekers are using the old initial screening rules as a loophole that gets them released into the interior where the vast majority are never seen by the government again unless they’re caught committing other crimes. When they fail to show up for their asylum hearings, a removal order is almost always applied. Rather than playing cat and mouse with hundreds of thousands of migrants, this new rule allows the administration to stop them before they’re released to the interior.

The executive branch is granted broad powers over immigration by the Constitution. Unless the White House fails to make a solid case or a moderate Justice like John Roberts or Brett Kavanaugh decides to go against the President, this rule is likely to be made permanent.

With less hope of gaining access to the interior, this rule is very likely to dissuade many asylum-seekers from making the long journey to the United States border. We can expect border crossing apprehensions to drop in the coming months.

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