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How Beto O’Rourke could solve the migrant crisis if he wanted to

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This is a transcript of the video above.

Let’s look at the migrant caravan crisis from a different perspective. Currently, the positions are very polarized between the two dominant political philosophies. On one hand, you have the progressives who mostly want the migrants at the border to be let into the nation, granted asylum, and given opportunities to build a better life. On the other hand, you have conservatives who want them to go through the process legally or simply go home.

Both positions have their merits, but both sides are also missing important points. The death of a 7-year-old Guatemalan migrant while in Border Patrol custody has sparked outrage from the left who blame the Trump administration’s policies for her death, while the right is equally outraged that the girl was forced to enter the country illegally when she could have received food, shelter, education, and healthcare in Mexico.

This girl’s horrible and avoidable death is now being politicized by both politicians and the media. Everyone’s pointing fingers. Nobody’s working on actual solutions.

As a sovereign nation, the government has a responsibility to its citizens to prevent foreign nationals from crossing the border illegally. As a nation that doesn’t turn its back on those who need help, the American people should have a sense of compassion for those who seek our help. We can accomplish both goals if the government does its job of defending the border while the people do our job of rendering assistance. It’s very important to note that the people, not the government, should be the ones rendering assistance to the migrants. The last thing we need is more intervention from Washington DC.

Private charities are fully capable of working with the Mexican government to provide better lives for the migrants. All Mexico has to do is continue to offer asylum to all the migrants and dramatically improve border security on their southern border. They’ve done what they can to mitigate the humanitarian crisis that is brewing even while their temporary facilities are being overrun. But combine Mexican asylum with good old fashioned American philanthropy and everyone can be happy.

It wouldn’t take much. Fundraising is easy for those who are willing to make it happen. With the funds that Democrat Beto O’Rourke accumulated during his failed Senate bid in Texas, every adult migrant can be paid the average Mexican household income for a full year. If one Senate candidate in a midterm election can raise those kinds of funds in a matter of months, surely the empathetic left and the industrious right could get together to raise even more in a much shorter period of time.

Instead of giving them food and a cot, philanthropic efforts could give these people real opportunities to succeed in Mexico. Those who still want to go through the process of entering the United States legally will have the resources to wait for it to happen in safety. Meanwhile, border patrol will be able to focus on the remaining illegal border crossings, the ones that aren’t at the border for an opportunity to earn American wages but who are trafficking illegal goods or nefarious people.

For this concept to work, both sides of the political aisle will have to abandon some of their false premises. Progressives will have to admit that our sovereignty is too important to encourage even more unlawful traffic than we already have at our southern border. They would also have to acknowledge that Mexico is offering asylum, so the notion that the migrants must be let in so they can escape their horrible situations in Central America is false.

On the other side of the aisle, conservatives have to understand that most of these people will not or cannot go back. We need to send the message to potential future migrants that they will not be able to circumvent our laws, but doing so does not require turning a blind eye because it’s not our problem. Don’t get me wrong. It’s definitely not our problem, which is why I would be opposed to taxpayer-funded solutions. However, a charitable solution would allow people to willingly pitch in without condemning our own sovereignty.

If a current or near future charity launched a massive drive to give the migrants more opportunity in Mexico, and this philanthropic drive coincided with efforts by the Mexican government to stop the flow of migrants crossing into their country, neither political side in America would be completely happy about it but both sides would have their concerns essentially eased.

This bears repeating. Beto O’Rourke raised enough money for his Senate campaign to pay every adult migrant at the border an average Mexican household income for a full year.

I invoked Beto O’Rourke for three reasons. First, he’s demonstrated an ability to raise money for something of minimal importance like a political campaign. Surely he could turn those efforts towards a philanthropic campaign and achieve even better results. The second reason I mentioned him is because he lost his race. Very soon, he’ll have nothing better to do. The third reason is that for something like this to work, a network of powerful people would need to get behind it. O’Rourke’s leftist buddies on the coasts plus his friends in Texas would be perfect for a scenario like this own.

Instead of the left calling for the President to relieve border restrictions or the right saying the only solution is for them to go back to the situation they chose to leave, we should be putting together the solution as a people. The only responsibility the government has in this whole mess is to prevent illegal border crossings and commit appropriate resources to work with those who are trying to enter legally.

I can already hear the complaints from both sides. The left will complain that helping them build lives in Mexico goes against their desire to achieve the American Dream. The right will say there are starving Americans who deserve our charity more than the migrants. Both sides are right, but this solution really doesn’t oppose either notion. To the left, I’d say if they choose to enter legally and work through the process we have in place, so be it. They’re welcome to pursue their version of the American dream as long as they do it within our laws. To the right, I’d say the charitable efforts put towards solving American problems would not be hampered by a campaign to help the migrants. If we’ve learned anything about American philanthropy, it’s that the vast charity of our citizens is driven by a diverse range of motivations. The money that would be given to help the migrants is not money that would have been given to help Americans. No domestic causes would be harmed by aiding the migrants.

If the left stops playing the open borders card and the right stops playing the not-our-problem card, we can make this solution happen. It may not be the solution either side wants, but it may be the only solution that can actually work.

I’m JD Rucker. Thank you for listening.


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