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Love is not exclusive: An open letter to Matt Walsh

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Dear Mr. Walsh,

I am a longtime follower of yours, but over the last few months it seems you are spending a lot of time calling out leaders of various faiths for not being Christian enough. Why would you want to alienate others who are also trying to do God’s work of spreading love the way they have interpreted it? The Bible leaves lots of room for interpretation. Was that unintentional? Perhaps there was a purpose for the parables instead of absolute answers.

No two people are going to believe the exact same thing nor hold the exact same approach of what is best to reach people to live an inspired life, even if those two people are reading from the exact same Bible. The important thing is getting others into the boat of doing good, loving all unconditionally, and bringing people together. What good does it do to divide us this way? Most of the time I applaud what you stand for, but I think this is wrong.

There are many different types of Christians with many different messages. But why focus on the differences? Jesus would surely want us to focus on the similarities… to love each other as brothers and sisters as we are, not push those who are slightly different outside of some line you have decided absolutely cannot be crossed.

I admit I know very little about all the different types of Christians that exist and the idiosyncrasies you insist on calling out. But I don’t need to because that’s not important. That line of thinking misses the greater message – that love is more important than our individual sects. We are all in this together. Christians from all walks are spreading their way of understanding the best they know how. They aren’t spreading evil. Anything outside the limits of your defined box doesn’t necessarily make it evil. As long as you are acting as a conduit of unconditional love, you have nothing to fear, ever.

The greatest of these is love. Not faith. That means your faith should never be more important than love

You have lost the purpose of following Christ in the first place. There are moments as a father when my daughter will give an extra piece of candy to her little sister just because she knows it will make her smile. But there are also moments when my daughter knows I’m watching and gives that candy to her sister only because she wants to be recognized as kind. See the difference?

Being a good Christian isn’t the end goal. Being Christian is supposed to be a means to a life of good, love, and worth. Don’t do good just because it keeps you within the Christian box and therefore gets you to Heaven. That is a selfish motivation. Do good for a better reason: Because you have love in your heart. Do good because you love unconditionally, and you truly want to help others be happy. It is the only thing that matters in our time here, and it’s how we grow in spirit. By learning in every action how we can perform that action in a loving way, we challenge ourselves spiritually in every choice we make.

When you are on your deathbed you won’t be thinking of how much money you made or how many people you excluded for being inadequately holy. You will be thinking of the way you treated others, and the litmus test for that judgment is unconditional love. If you are acting in accordance with love for your neighbor, you will be proud of your actions as you lay there reflecting on your life. But if instead you are acting out of fear, those will be the actions that haunt you in your last days.

Love

Love is the means and it is also the ends. It is the lesson and the reward. It is the guide and the destination. We are meant to spread that love where ever and whenever we can, without restrictions. Only then are we truly walking in the light of God.

First Corinthians 13:13 is certainly very cliché, especially at weddings, but it holds an insight that many of us often overlook.

“And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.”

The greatest of these is love. Not faith. That means your faith should never be more important than love… Unconditional love, not just love for your family and friends. Love for all. And not with conditions like, only if he is a Christian, or only if she acts the way I think she should. Unconditionally means as they are. Love him because he is. For if we only love those who love us back, what kind of love is that?

Dan Alexander

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Culture and Religion

PragerU: Does race really matter?

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PragerU Does race really matter

Leftwing talk about race frightens Dennis Prager and it should frighten you as well. There is a dangerous precedent being set by the left that is creating division where it no longer exists. Unfortunately, it definitely did exist in the recent past, but modern America generally does not look at race as much of an indicator anymore EXCEPT when the left makes it an issue. This is ironic, of course, because in their quest to supposedly eliminate racism, the left tends to make race a bigger issue than it needs to be.

We hear about cultural appropriations, certain races whose lives apparently matter more than others, and the deconstruction of our nation’s history based upon cultural norms from the time that are no longer acceptable now. Yes, many of America’s first people were racist. Some even owned slaves. Even after slavery was abolished, we experienced racial divides that continued through the civil rights movement all the way into modern times. But today, those divides are no longer as prominent. A black President was elected with a strong number of non-black voters behind him. Congress is more racially and sexually diverse than ever in our country’s history. We have more CEOs of major corporations who aren’t just “old white guys” than ever.

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America is making strong strides to effectively eliminate racial inequality, but the push to keep the divide as wide as possible isn’t coming from the general conservative side of the political aisle. Yes, there are white supremacists who claim a portion of the right-leaning mantle, but they are infinitesimal compared to the standard masses of conservatives who have seen beyond race. The real cultural and racial divides are being perpetuated by the left, and in particular by our leaders from the Democratic Party who cannot have a future if they do not play the race card incessantly.

This video by PragerU shows the stark difference between Dennis Prager and Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). As she vies for votes by playing the race card, Mr. Prager calls out the real racism in America that’s coming from the left.

 


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What are the spiritual beings in the Bible?

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What are the spiritual beings in the Bible

Most people, even those who haven’t read the Bible, are likely familiar with it enough to know there are two primary groups being discussed: humans and God in his three forms, also known as the Trinity. Those who have read the Bible realize there are other groups of being as well. These are the “spiritual beings” of the Bible – angels, demons, and everything in between.

While I don’t always agree with everything taught by the folks at The Bible Project, most of their perspectives are excellent. More importantly, they’re able to break down the complex elements of the Bible and retell the stories in ways anyone can understand.

They’ve begun a new series focused on spiritual beings that I’m very hopeful will be enlightening and exegetically accurate. This is an important teaching to understand. While I’d recommend reading one of Michael Heiser’s books on the subject, those who aren’t ready for lengthy research should at least take a look at this or other teachings. It’s an important topic, one that gets much less attention than it deserves.

As we continue to work on our Principalities and Powers Podcast, it behooves us that more people are aware of the forces that we don’t necessarily see that are at work around us. This is why we’re hopeful about this new series from The Bible Project.

 


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The Catholic-Mulsim fraternity deal is anti-Biblical

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The Catholic-Mulsim fraternity deal is anti-Biblical

Before I get into the meat of this subject, it’s important to be perfectly clear about one thing. This is not an anti-Catholic perspective. I not only love my Catholic brothers and sisters who follow the Bible and embrace Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior. I’m actually related to a great deal of them. Yes, the majority of my large family on my mother’s side is Catholic. Spent the day with about a dozen of them yesterday.

With that stated, the leadership of the Catholic Church and the direction of the Vatican are so far off course, it’s odd that so few are actually calling them out for what is arguably the most anti-Biblical action they’ve ever officially taken. As bad as the action was, I’m more concerned that it’s not getting nearly the press it deserves.

I’m referring to the agreement signed by Pope Francis and Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayeb, the head of Sunni Islam’s most prestigious seat of learning. In this agreement, the truth of the God of the Bible is intermingled with the falsehood of the god of the Quran, Allah. Moreover, the call for the unification of religions in a fraternity of secular peace is disturbing, not because we’re against peace but because the call to make peace is done with an understanding that or beliefs are supposed to be secondary to the collective good in this world. Lastly and most disturbingly, there’s a line in the document that is drawing some ire, though not nearly as much as Bible-believing Christians might expect:

“The pluralism and the diversity of religions, color, sex, race and language are willed by God in his wisdom, through which he created human beings.”

The wording here is very careful. They’re trying not to say God willed other religions as a path to find Him, but when read in context with the rest of the document, that’s exactly what they’re trying to imply. They’ve put Islam on equal footing with the Judeo-Christian religions by insinuating God and Allah are the same entity.

They are not.

Defenses of the document seem to focus on two notions. First, in regards to the controversial line above, they’re saying that religious diversity is similar to sex, race, and other things that are willed by God because many are inherently predisposed to follow the religions of the culture surrounding them. Their second argument is that God wants his children to find Him, and if that path must go through Islam or Hindu or any other religion, so be it.

This is heretical teaching. One must do some pretty aggressive hermeneutical gymnastics to say that since God created everything, and other religions fall into the category of being included in “everything,” then God created the other religions. As a loving God, surely He didn’t limit which people could find Him and live eternal life, right?

The Bible cannot be more clear on one important fact: there is only one way to everlasting life: belief and worship of Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior. The document insinuates Islam is a path to salvation since, hey, they believe that Jesus was a very important prophet, so they’re not totally wrong. If it leads them to Christ through a non-traditional path, so be it.

This is a very dangerous road, one that harms the way the Catholic Church leads its people. It’s time for Bible-believing Catholics to speak out against the heretical teaching their leaders have embraced.

 


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