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Congress is broken. It needs to adopt the Docket System

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Congress to stop paying sexual harassment claims with taxpayer dollars

The Omibus bill-now-law is a small cherry on top of the mounting evidence that our Congressional legislature is broken. The system is designed to empower those in charge that hold no Constitutional authority. A Senate Majority leader has no derivative in the Constitution, yet this title has such an influence on the legislative process. Consider this:

Have not such bills been floating around in Congress for years. Let’s see back in 2015, a Congressmen introduced H.R.1013 – Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act. It was last sent to the subcommittee on trade and the bill has never been seen again. The current Congress has a dozen or so marijuana related bills all sitting in committee, but legalizing Hemp may see the light of day because McConnell wants to appease a group of people, while similar bills are missing in committee. Most people favor Congressional term limits. Many run on them. Yet during the 1990s, many bills/ Constitutional Amendments were proposed. All of them never saw the light of day once going being sent to a committee. Senators Perdue (R-GA) and Kennedy (R-LA) introduced the Balanced Budget Accountability Act on January 11th, 2017. Nothing has become of it in over a year. Both Senators opposed the Omnibus spending bill, in case you were curious.

See my point? Instead of simple to understand legislation having its honest day on the floor, we the people instead get ramrodded with behemoth bills none of theses legislatures read. This monstrosity gets forced on the Senate and is instantly, because of the likes of McConnell and Schumer, at the tippy top of the priority list. In a matter of days, this bill passed the Senate while principled solutions from the left or right never see the light of day for they were not written by lobbyist who own the committees and majority leaders. Voting out the McConnells isn’t enough. We need to fundamentally change the legislative process.

Congress is the most important branch of government. For this reason, the legislative branch is Article 1 in the constitution. In Article 1 Section 7 we find the legislative process. Section 7 deals with the veto process rather than getting nitty-gritty about committees and subcommittees. Looking at the current situation, it’s clear Congress is too big to be effective for the people. The legislative process empowers committees who host members whom are no more qualified to legislate on matters than nonmembers. It bogs down legislatures who come up with solutions outside of their groups.

Docket System

I purpose we systematically rewrite the song “I’m just a Bill.” We need to get rid of committees and instead move towards a docket system. Under the Docket System, every bill will be voted on it its respective chamber. This is beneficial because we will see just where our elected officials truly stand on a matter of issues. A bill will be introduced and from there receive it’s day to be voted on, a very well off date, and schedule hearings if necessary, also in the distant future. If a bill has one sponsor, it will not be prioritized. In order to move higher on the docket, the bill needs to gain more sponsors. If a bill reaches a threshold of sponsors, say 35 in the Senate, it can get prioritized within and be voted on within a week. Bills that advance through one chamber will get prioritized in the next. The system is designed to get backlogged, but if matters are significant, legislators will sponsor legislature on them. Our criminal justice system has a process for seeing every case according to the 6th Amendment. I believe it possible for Congress to enable a system that is attentive to every bill, needing only be a fraction as fast as the trial process.

The purpose of this would be to first strip Congress of extra-constitutional titles, and second to ensure that bills are simple, heard, and voted on. Otherwise, we are stuck hearing things about Kate’s Law, the REINS Act, Concealed Carry Reciprocity, term limits, balanced budget amendments, and all these nice things campaign conservatives support.  Truthfully, the issues in Congress are more numerous in the Senate than the House of Representatives. Kate’s Law passed the House and was received in the Senate on July 10, 2017. No action has taken place since in a Republican held Senate. Yet the Omnibus got the ultimate fast pass. We need real change. As Congress buries itself in arcane rules and procedures designed to preserve a political class, so the legislative process is slowed for legislators who genuinely want to drain the swamp. The Senate Majority Leader need not exist in official title or duties. Only the titles and processes laid in Article 1 are the framework for our legislative process. The rest is entirely optional.

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Culture and Religion

17 years later, Paul Washer’s shocking message still holds true

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17 years later Paul Washers shocking message still holds true

In 2002, Pastor Paul Washer delivered a message to around 5,000 young people. It has become one of the fiery Southern Baptist’s mostly widely-heard sermons because in it, we hear a very disturbing reality to most who proclaim to be Christians. Some simply aren’t doing it right.

He’s been criticized for the sermon. Some say he’s making it too complicated. Others say he’s scaring people away from the faith by making it seem too difficult. But this teaching is based on one of the most important teachings of Jesus Christ in all the Bible:

Matthew 7:13-27

13 Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat:

14 Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.

15 Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.

16 Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?

17 Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit.

18 A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.

19 Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.

20 Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them.

21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.

22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?

23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.

24 Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock:

25 And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock.

26 And every one that heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them not, shall be likened unto a foolish man, which built his house upon the sand:

27 And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it.

I’ve heard many teach on these verses and I’ve taught myself on the strait and narrow. It’s frightening to some because it was intended to be, and Washer’s declarations to these impressionable young people is clear. But it wasn’t nice. It wasn’t kind. It wasn’t inclusive. It didn’t fit in with today’s version of common pastoral messages.

The need for constant repentance and ongoing belief must never be understated.

Sometimes, the need to be “nice” from the pulpit must be replaced by the true need to be honest. That’s what Washer does in this famous teaching. I strongly encourage everyone to spend an hour hearing it.

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Conservatism

Why Tomi Lahren’s abortion view harms American conservatism

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Why Tomi Lahrens abortion view harms American conservatism

Democrats are unambiguous and united in their view of abortion. It wasn’t always this way. As recently as a decade ago, there were a good number of pro-life Democrats winning elections and expressing their views as pundits.

Today, they don’t exist.

Republicans aren’t so repulsed by the pro-abortion people in their midst. It’s understandable that as a party that’s less focused on individual issues, one can be a Republican without checking off all the various boxes. This is fine. What’s not fine is for breaks in the ranks of conservatives. There are certain things that must remain universal among those who claim to embrace conservatism, especially among those who speak for conservatives.

Fox Nation’s Tomi Lahren is one of them. She claims to be a conservative, but she’s pro-choice. That fact, by itself, is understandable because the issue is a polarizing one in which people can be swayed to one side based on personal experience. It’s not like taxes which warrant universal scorn from conservatives. There are gun-toting, tax-hating, pro-choice conservatives.

But there’s a bigger problem with Lahren’s perspective. She’s not just attacking the Alabama abortion bill and pro-life perspectives in general. She’s doing so with an argument that flies in the face of reality.

Do we think government is the answer? No. In fact, one of the most appealing parts about the Alabama abortion bill is that it represents the first true opportunity for the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade. When it reaches the Supreme Court (and it almost certainly will) it gives us the first glimpse of how the current makeup of the court will react. In fact, the makeup of the court could actually be better if one of the left-leaning Justices retires soon.

Once Roe v. Wade is out of the way, we can finally express the truly conservative aspect of federalism that should have never been taken away – the states’ rights to determine their own healthcare laws.

If Tomi Lahren doesn’t like the abortion ban, that’s fine. Her choice. But to defend her choice by insinuating a challenge to Roe v. Wade is somehow an attack on limited-government tenets is false and harms conservatism.

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Guns and Crime

Thomas Massie exposes the many problems with Red Flag Gun Laws

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Thomas Massie exposes the many problems with Red Flag Gun Laws

Representative Thomas Massie (R-KY) has been a staunch proponent of the 2nd Amendment throughout his career in Washington DC. This makes him an opponent to Red Flag Gun Laws which are spreading across the states. Colorado recently passed their version, bringing the total up to 15.

As we’ve documented numerous times, Red Flag Gun Laws are a direct attack on the 2nd and 4th Amendments. Depending on the version of the law, citizens can have their firearms forcibly removed from them by law enforcement when a judge decrees they may be a threat to themselves or others based on requests by people who know the victim. It’s important to understand that these laws are not based on anyone committing a crime. They are based on a feeling that someone may commit a crime.

It’s like the movie Minority Report, only without psychics. Gun owners’ liberties can be encroached based on the government’s “future crimes division.”

In this video, Massey gets to the heart of the matter by talking to Colorado Weld County Sheriff Steve Reams and Dr. John R. Lott of Crime Prevention Research Center. This is an important video for #2A proponents across the nation.

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