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Rashida Tlaib gets a ‘calming feeling’ whenever she thinks of the Holocaust

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Rashida Tlaib gets a 'calming feeling' whenever she thinks of the Holocaust

There are times when something a politician reportedly says is so shocking, one has to assume it was taken out of context. This happens regularly to politicians and it usually turns out all the fuss was over nothing. In the case of Representative Rashida Tlaib’s comments today regarding the Holocaust, there is no context in which her sentiment could be made to seem anything other than what it was: a blatant anti-Semitic attack veiled behind colorful epithets that expressed her feelings about the Jews while pretending it was no big deal.

It was a very big deal.

Here’s the statement that has those opposed to anti-Semitic bigotry up in arms (emphasis ours):

“There’s always kind of a calming feeling I tell folks when I think of the Holocaust, and the tragedy of the Holocaust, and the fact that it was my ancestors — Palestinians — who lost their land and some lost their lives, their livelihood, their human dignity, their existence in many ways, have been wiped out, and some people’s passports. And just all of it was in the name of trying to create a safe haven for Jews, post-the Holocaust, post-the tragedy and the horrific persecution of Jews across the world at that time. And I love the fact that it was my ancestors that provided that, right, in many ways. But they did it in a way that took their human dignity away and it was forced on them.”

Here’s the thing. Under no circumstance should someone get a calming feeling when thinking about the Holocaust. Following that statement up by mentioning briefly about the horrific persecution of the Jews does nothing to remove the overarching sentiment in the whole statement, the blatant anti-Semitism associated with her calming feeling, or the categorically false claim that her ancestors helped provide them safe haven.

Philip Klein at the Washington Examiner did an excellent job of breaking down the historical fallacies she was somehow able to squeeze into such a short statement:

  • The Jewish presence in the area currently known as Israel dates back thousands of years, and the modern migration of Jews back there pre-dated the Holocaust by many decades, starting with the migration of Jews from Yemen in 1881.
  • With the Balfour Declaration of 1917, the British government supported the establishment of a Jewish state in the area, an idea rejected by Arabs.
  • In 1937, the British Peel Commission proposed a two-state solution to Jews and Arabs, which the Arabs once again rejected because they could not accept any Jewish presence in the region.
  • During World War II, the Palestinian leader at the time, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem Muhammad Amin al-Husayni, met with Adolf Hitler and allied with the Nazis. As the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum recounts, “al-Husayni collaborated with the German and Italian governments by broadcasting pro-Axis, anti-British, and anti-Jewish propaganda via radio to the Arab world; inciting violence against Jews and the British authorities in the Middle East; and recruiting young men of Islamic faith for service in German military, Waffen-SS , and auxiliary units. In turn, the Germans and the Italians used al-Husayni as a tool to inspire support and collaboration among Muslim residents of regions under Axis control and to incite anti-Allied violence and rebellion among Muslims residing beyond the reach of German arms.”
  • After World War II, when the Jewish people declared the state of Israel, their official proclamation said, “We appeal – in the very midst of the onslaught launched against us now for months – to the Arab inhabitants of the State of Israel to preserve peace and participate in the upbuilding of the State on the basis of full and equal citizenship and due representation in all its provisional and permanent institutions.” Instead of choosing to live peacefully, however, Arab leaders encouraged Arabs to flee Israel, and the next day, the young nation was invaded by Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Iraq.
  • The terrorist group the Palestine Liberation Organization was founded in 1964, three years before Israel occupied the West Bank in the Six Day War, territories that we’re now led to believe is at the heart of the conflict.

If this statement were isolated, one might argue she was just being insensitive. But her short history on Capitol Hill combined with her long history before joining the House of Representatives betrays the reality of her feelings. She’s opposed to the nation of Israel and has a major problem with the Jewish people. Her Islamic roots have bled into her political style and fomented her core feelings into nearly everything she says and does in Washington DC.

Only a true bigot gets a calming feeling from the Holocaust. But this is part of the normalization of anti-Semitism within the Democratic Party. As some rush to defend her, they reveal their own internal hatred towards the Jews.

Update: Tlaib responded to the criticism. Our EIC had a snarky reaction to it.


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