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The art of being a loser



Roy Moore Victory

It’s not often that I get to bring you all TRULY good news. It feels SO GOOD to tell the story of Judge Roy Moore’s well deserved victory in Alabama.

The political angles will be analyzed for months and deserve scrutiny. But I’d like to address this from a slightly different angle – so please bear with me!

Before becoming a radio hostess I spent almost 14 years in advertising sales. Radio, television, billboards, bus wraps… you name it! Sales is a brutal yet refining craft, especially if you endeavor to approach it honestly and with integrity.

Cold calling, scouring the Yellow Pages, slammed doors, ‘Get Losts’, proposals thrown in the trash, creepy clients who wasted hours of my time because they thought they could get a date, hours spent on presentations only to lose the sale because of nepotism or favoritism. Brutal sexual harassment from managers and bosses… these were the struggles that I suspect many salespeople face.

Yet they were overshadowed by the wins. The wins were GLORIOUS and meaningful. They led to very successful career in media. Even more precious to me were the deep and lasting relationships I formed with clients and colleagues that have spanned decades!

So what is my POINT? What does this have to do with Politics?

I learned very early in my career that in order to WIN without cheating or manipulating … I had to learn to LOSE. My job was to be rejected often, to be a LOSER!

Let me explain…

  • For every 100 phone calls, I would get 10 appointments.
  • For every 10 appointments, I would get 3 pitches.
  • For every 3 pitches, I would get ONE new client.

And I won! But only occasionally. With that crazy formula I built a solid client base and gave myself a pretty good raise every year. And when I had children – that formula gave me the flexibility to stay home with my kids 4 out of 7 days a week.

More importantly, losing refined my character. It made me stronger. I learned humility, perseverance and resilience. And I’m glad for that.

You see, I think in politics, whether we are running for office, starting a news site, activating locally or organizing a movement, we mistakenly obsess over the WINS rather than the refining process of losing. If an entity isn’t always winning we assume they must be losing.

And this is where principled people often get trapped. We might cheat, or manipulate or sell out in order to chase the win rather than understand that the PROCESS of selling our Constitutional ideals and acting with integrity is MORE important than cheap, political wins.

The process of getting up, giving our ALL, acting with integrity, telling the truth, working hard, advocating for our principles and then losing is usually enough to make most of us give up.

They key is to get up, dust off and do it AGAIN.

And again.

And again.

And again.

And I promise you all that the wins will come. They are few and far between but they are MEANINGFUL. These are the victories that change the course of nations and define generations.

I’m going to savor this victory in Alabama and return to it when the defeats are rolling in. I promise you that I will continue to work the formula and hope you will too. Cheerfully and with great heart, as long as God calls me to do so!

Are you with me?

Shannon Joy is a Rochester native and on a mission to inform and empower today’s busy women! She hosts the Conservative Chic radio program “Shannon Joy”.

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  1. Shannon

    September 27, 2017 at 1:07 pm

    Thanks for posting guys!

  2. Ellie Gable

    September 27, 2017 at 6:02 pm

    Spot on. As someone who’s faced the same challenges in sales I can tell you I now appreciate wins like Moore’s a lot more. When they’re so few and far between, it makes them more special.

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Social media one cause for adolescence now starting at 10 and lasting until 24



Social media one cause for adolescence now starting at 10 and lasting until 24

A new scientific paper out of England proposes that social media is one cause for both the premature ending of childhood and delayed transition to adulthood until age 24.

The age of adolescence is the phase of life stretching between childhood and adulthood, and its definition has long posed a conundrum. Adolescence encompasses elements of biological growth and major social role transitions, both of which have changed in the past century. Earlier puberty has accelerated the onset of adolescence in nearly all populations, while understanding of continued growth has lifted its endpoint age well into the 20s. In parallel, delayed timing of role transitions, including completion of education, marriage, and parenthood, continue to shift popular perceptions of when adulthood begins.

The paper suggests a view of adolescence as between the ages of 10 and 24 “corresponds more closely to adolescent growth and popular understandings of this life phase.”

The paper also remarked on the role of social media, regarding it as being among the “unprecedented social forces…affecting health and wellbeing across these years.”

The paper cited “delayed timing of role transitions, including completion of education, marriage and parenthood” in affecting the perception of when adulthood effectively begins. It goes on to suggest the longer range of adolescence is “essential” for “developmentally appropriate framing of laws, social policies, and service systems.”

If the paper’s premise were adopted, one logical conclusion would be the extension of the period in life when one might enjoy the privileges of adulthood, such as voting and driving automobiles, without the corresponding responsibilities or legal liabilities of being an adult (for which those costs are often shifted to the innocent victims or society in general). For example, in many states, minors (under age 18) are treated as juveniles and often receive much more lenient sentences (and charging decisions) on account of age, even when their crime is very much a “grown-up” crime and the impact of the crime on the victim is no less.

One can also view this as cynical social engineering. A call to increase social services, with the justification of an expanded population “in need” and “at risk,” would result in subsequent calls for increased government funding of social services. As someone has to be paid to provide those services, the redefinition of adolescence can be suspected to be merely the latest pseudo-scientific attempt to lengthen the public employee / social services gravy train, which always seems to run on time.

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Culture and Religion

The strange tale of the Turpin family



The strange tale of the Turpin family

Abuse of children is one of the most horrible things anyone can do. Rarely do I even read stories about abuse. I know it exists. I’m against it. I don’t want reminders of how evil some people really are. The story of the Turpin family drew me in and made me weep for a world that allows such things to happen.

Here’s the story, followed by my brief thoughts:

California family: Parents charged after children found shackled, 57, and Louise, 49, are accused of holding their children captive in their Perris, California, home in filthy conditions, some of them shackled to beds with chains and padlocks. The 13 siblings range in age from 2 to 29.

The parents are charged with torture and child endangerment, and scheduled for a court hearing Thursday. Bail was set at $9 million each. It was not immediately clear if the suspects had attorneys or whether they had entered a plea.

On Sunday, one of their daughters, a 17-year-old, managed to escape from their home by climbing out a window and called 911 from a deactivated cell phone she found in the house, police said. She told officers her parents were holding her 12 siblings captive inside the home, the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department said.

My Take

There’s a danger here. We have to be mindful of children who are being abused. Unfortunately, that also means there will be times when the state must intervene. Any time that happens, I get worried. I want as little intervention as possible and only when absolutely necessary. The story of the Turpin family is an example of it being necessary.

The problem is that this evil was allowed to continue for decades. How can that happen? How do we respect the rights of parents and embrace a non-interfering government when there are people like the Turpins in the world? It’s a slippery slope and I have no answers.

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How to debate your political enemies… and win



How to debate your political enemies and win

It’s no secret that we live in a world of political division. Not only are liberals at war with conservatives, but both sides of the political spectrum are at war with themselves.

While my preference is unity, it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen anytime soon, judging by social media. Since that’s the case, then people need to at least, learn how to debate effectively.

Here are four things to remember before getting into your next political debate:

1. Stop letting your opponent control the language

Until pregnant, pro-choice women start having fetus showers on a regular basis, it’s not a “fetus”. It’s a baby.

Until guns jump off the table, run down the street, and start shooting people on their own, it’s not “gun violence”. It’s just violence.

When you let your opponent control the language, you let them control the debate. You allow them the opportunity to soften their position through less controversial verbiage, making their position sound almost reasonable.

Call a spade a spade. Catering to politically correct double-speak is a form of soft tyranny.

2. Know your opponent and their tactics, then call them on it

I learned this one watching Ben Shapiro take on Piers Morgan in an interview regarding the 2nd Amendment. Ben had researched Piers’ tactics, and at the beginning of the interview, called him out on them, pointing out that Morgan has a tendency to resort to name-calling vitriol, ad hominem attacks, and attempts to paint his opponent as low intellect Neanderthals, whenever he ran out of talking points to support his position. Shapiro went on to say that he trusted that Morgan wouldn’t engage in those same tactics in their debate.

Morgan was instantly taken aback, batted his eyelashes innocently, and went into full denial mode. The interview went smoothly for a while, with Morgan refraining from his typical tactics, but true to form, reverted to his normal attacks when Shapiro had him backed into a corner, giving him the ammo he needed to point out that he was correct in his initial assessment of Morgan’s tactics.

I’ve implemented this strategy in many debates, and without fail, it’s been effective.

3. Don’t go on defense

It’s inevitable. In any debate, on any topic, your opponent is going to spend the bulk of their time, telling you why your position is wrong and why you’re a bad person for holding it. All too often, I see good people take this bait and retreat into a mode of defending themselves, rather than defending their position, or going on offense against their opponents position.

It’s a natural reaction to try and defend your character, morality or ethics when they come under attack. However, the second you do, you’ve just handed the debate to your opponent.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve been called a “gun nut that doesn’t care about children”. Until I learned the tactic of not taking that bait, my reaction was usually “I am not a gun nut and I love kids”. Now, my reaction is “If being a proponent of the basic, human right to self defense, not only for me, but for the protection of children, makes me a ‘nut,’ so be it. What I think is nutty is being opposed to those things.”

Guess which one of those reactions is more effective in winning the debate.

4. Don’t allow deflection

When people are losing a debate, they tend to drift into side topics. It’s not unusual for a pro-abortion advocate to drift into healthcare as a whole, or for a gun control advocate to drift into government provided “safety”.

Don’t follow people down these rabbit holes. Drag them right back out, and force them to stay on the topic of hand. The moment you start following them is the moment you’ve given them control to lead you to separate topics, control the debate, and muddy the waters of the original topic.

Debate is a healthy thing when done right. It’s done right when the right strategies are applied. So engage, but engage to win. I assume your position is worth it.

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