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Canadian Doctor Danielle Martin on single-payer healthcare

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Dr Danielle Martin on Socialized Healthcare

Margaret Thatcher once said, “The trouble with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money.” This premise rings true for socialized medicine, described by most pundits as “single-payer healthcare.” The economic burden it would create if it ever came to be in America would be devastating.

That’s not the only problem. The immediate impact of socialized medicine is that it makes it extremely difficult to get medical care that doesn’t fall into the category of “life threatening.” When healthcare is free, people tend to get as much as they can whenever they can. There’s an appeal to something being “free” that drives people. The result is that everyone tries to get every bit of free healthcare they can which causes a shortage of available slots to provide the procedures.

If that sounds good to you, tell that to the person who’s stuck waiting for hip replacement surgery for a year or more.

Senator Bernie Sanders, the mastermind behind the current push for single-payer by the Democrats, had Dr. Danielle Martin on his show. She cheered the positive benefits, but she had to admit to one of the major flaws in such a system. The answer earned her a permanent place in our Quotes archive.

“If I have a patient who’s got migraines and I need advice about how to manage it, they might wait several months to see a neurologist for a non-urgent problem like that. Or non-urgent surgeries,  he classic example being a hip or a knee replacement.”

Source: Politistick

  • Dr Danielle Martin on Socialized Healthcare

  • Dr Danielle Martin on Socialized Healthcare

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Glen Walters

    September 19, 2017 at 12:17 am

    Most of the negative information we get from the Canadian health care system is planted by people paid for by the US medical and pharmaceutical companies to discourage us from doing it. To much profit, they rip us off billions every year. The US should just adopt the Canadian system but with universal single payer for all states. Maybe using Medicaid for every one. Canada’s health care system is best described as a collection of plans administered by the 10 provinces and 3 territories, each differing from the others in some respects but similarly structured to meet the federal conditions for funding. The simplicity of the five federal conditions is arguably one of the beauties of the Canadian system. They are the provision of all medically necessary services (defined as most physician and hospital services), the public administration of the system, the portability of coverage throughout Canada, the universal coverage of all citizens and residents, and the absence of user charges at the point of care for core medical and hospital services. Each province (and territory) has a number of options for financing its share of the cost for its health insurance plan. Some provinces have opted to finance their health insurance costs through the payment of premiums; other provinces and territories have chosen to finance their shares through various taxes and/or other revenue streams: Each province and territory has considerable leeway in determining how its share of the cost of its health insurance plan will be financed. Financing can be through the payment of premiums (as is the case in Alberta and British Columbia), payroll taxes, sales taxes, other provincial or territorial revenues, or by a combination of methods. Health insurance premiums are permitted as long as residents are not denied coverage for medically necessary hospital and physician services because of an inability to pay such premiums. Provinces that levy premiums have also instituted premium assistance schemes that are based on income, and those who cannot afford to pay premiums may apply for assistance through the provincial health insurance plans. A family of two living in the province of British Columbia would pay in monthly Medical Service Plan (MSP) premiums about $96.00 for a family of 2. If they used the American system, their children could be on the plan until they were 26. The highest federal income tax rate in Canada is 29% (for persons with annual taxable income over $120,887), and the highest provincial income tax rate in British Columbia is 14.7% (for those with annual taxable incomes over over $95,909). The typical upper-income level Canadian taxpayer is not in a 55% tax bracket. By way of comparison, a typical upper-income level American taxpayer residing in California pays a roughly equivalent share of his income in federal and state taxes, even though the U.S. has no national health insurance program. As noted above, any broad statement about Canada’s health insurance program is difficult to assess because Canada has a number of different provincial/territorial programs, not one national program. Wait times for medical procedures in particular can vary quite widely across provinces, cities, and individual hospitals, and of course wait times can also vary widely depending upon the type of procedures involved. What was not found was any study demonstrating that doctors in Canada are more likely to issue prescriptions in lieu of performing more thorough diagnoses than doctors in any other western countries are. An important factor to consider in this area (one which is not unique to Canada) was reported in a 1997 British Medical Journal article which noted that studies have found patients often report dissatisfaction with their doctors if they don’t receive prescriptions as a result of office visits, even if prescriptions are not the best course of treatment for their health issues. A 2005 survey conducted by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Canadian Medical Association, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada reported that “more than 4 million Canadians do not have access to a family doctor.” This figure represented about 12% of the 2005 population of Canada. Note that the term “family doctor” as used here refers to a family (or general) practitioner. Thus the statement “some Canadians do not have family doctors” does not simply mean those persons see a number of different physicians instead regularly visiting the same physician; it means they do not have access to physicians who specifically practice family medicine. As with other kinds of medical care, emergency room treatment wait times can vary quite widely from province to province, region to region, and hospital to hospital. A 2005-2006 study of Ontario emergency departments conducted by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) found the following: Ninety per cent of patients who went to major teaching hospitals were seen within nine hours while the vast majority of patients who sought care at busy community hospitals (those with more than 30,000 emergency visits per year) concluded their visits within 7-1/2 hours. Waits were shorter in less busy community hospitals, where 90 per cent of patients spent three hours or less seeking and receiving emergency care. But only 30 per cent of people in need of help went to these smaller institutions. Seventy per cent sought assistance at either the busier community hospitals or teaching institutions, where waits were two or three times longer. The good news for the extremely ill is that 50 per cent of patients who require the most urgent care were seen by a doctor within six minutes and 86 per cent were seen within 30 minutes of arrival in emergency departments. Geography clearly mattered in terms of wait times, according to the study data. People in the Toronto area, where 90 per cent of patients were in and out in just under 12 hours, faced the longest delays. The shortest waits were in the Sudbury-Sault Ste. Marie area, where 90 per cent of patients finished their visit to hospital emergency departments in about 4-1/2 hours

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