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TNA’s new Managing Editor Steve Berman: In his own words

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Some people are politics junkies. Others are addicted to news. I am more of a “why” kind of guy.

I grew up in a fairly non-political family. My parents were blue-collar, and I started out in a blended family. My dad was a widower with three boys, my mom was a divorcee with two girls, and together they had my brother and me. I was the baby—born in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1964, when the Vietnam War was ramping up and the space race was white hot.

I don’t believe my mother ever voted for anyone but a Democrat her whole life. She’d vote a straight blue ticket, and she always voted. She divorced my dad when I was just four, and married my step-dad, Danny, when I was eleven. We moved to seacoast New Hampshire after that, where I did most of my growing up.

Although my mother, father and stepfather were all blue-collar workers, they believed in hard work and education. My dad was a tool and die maker at General Electric for 40 years. That position no longer exists—it’s been replaced by desktop CAD and numerical control machines. He used to do trigonometry in his head. My step-dad was a welder at the same GE plant, also for four decades—he ran the welding school in the marine steam turbine division.

All five of my mother’s children attended college. Of my six siblings, four graduated college, including myself. My oldest brother Roy had a degree in chemical engineering from Northeastern—he passed away last year. My brother Barry had a great career as an electrician, and eventually an inspector for the MBTA in Boston; he retired recently.

My two sisters both went to the University of Massachusetts, and my brother Jay and I graduated from the University of New Hampshire.

My mother and father were both full-blooded Jews, and ensured we had a Jewish education. My stepfather was Italian, but converted to Judaism at 50 years old to marry my mother (including the, err, anatomical bit). We were generally non-observant Jews, but I had seven years of Hebrew, which I can still read and understand.

The first presidential election I voted in was 1984. I voted for Reagan. My mom voted for Mondale, whom I couldn’t stand.

By the time I left college, I was fairly non-political (but left-leaning), very technical, and confident that I could do whatever I put my mind to. I remember Bill Clinton giving a speech literally in the field behind my condo in 1992. When the whole Gennifer Flowers thing erupted, I remember thinking “well, he’s dead.” I voted for Perot that year.

Then I moved to Central Georgia, where I observed the great lamentation and gnashing of teeth at Clinton’s election. I couldn’t understand why they so despised the man—after all he was a southerner like Jimmy Carter, right?

As I began to learn about politics and people, I realized that the “why” of ideas mattered far more than the “who” or the “team.” I began to realize that political contests are many times just popularity contests. I realized that the people we end up with in elected office, at the local, state, and federal level, are deeply flawed, and usually not the most competent person to do the job.

I learned that the biggest embedded self-interest group in America is the government itself, made up of a million people drawing paychecks funded by our taxes.

And I learned that the news we see, both online and on the boob tube, is generally presented to us in a way to influence our thinking, not to educate us to make our own decisions.

In 1995, I started a small company to sell Internet service in Warner Robins, Georgia. Less than a year later, I left my job at Robins Air Force Base to run that company full time. We started it with $52,000 in scraped-together capital, and sold it five years later for $2.5 million.

Then I spent about 15 years in various positions at a software company, incubating a payment services company, and helping to sell both to a multinational public corporation. By then, I’d had it with corporate life.

My experience with helping political campaigns, taught me it’s a dirty business filled with lots of charlatans and featherbedders, and you had to be careful to choose honest, competent people. Just like the news, just like business, just like government, it’s best to know “why” than just to blindly root for a team.

One day at my corporate job, the executive I reported to made an offhand remark that I could have another career as a writer after he read a motivational piece I wrote for my employees. So in 2014, I began pursuing that. I probably should have started in 1992.

What can I say? I’m a late bloomer.

I wrote a diary at RedState, and published on my own blog. I began writing for the local newspaper (I still do). I wrote for a year at Bizpac Review. Then I was offered the opportunity to be a featured contributor for Erick Erickson’s new website, The Resurgent. I was there the day the site debuted.

I’ve been cited by the New York Times, had pieces picked up by Fox News and RealClearPolitics, and published in The Stream.

Instead of simply cheerleading or spinning the news, I think it’s vital to know why things happen. I think it’s important to read news and trends from smaller outlets, by sometimes unknown writers.

I believe we learn more about the human condition by reading Flannery O’Connor on raising peafowl, or Adam Serwer on Robert E. Lee (Serwer is a senior political editor at The Atlantic) than the daily fare served up by the New York Times or Washington Post.

Why people believe what they believe is far more important than what some celebrity or senator thinks about the latest Trump tweets.

Of course, it’s important to keep up with news and events. Failing to do so is like putting one’s head in a gas oven that won’t heat up looking for the pilot light, while breathing in the gas.

But going deeper and to the edges of that coverage, and getting to the “whys” is the main reason I took on the responsibility of editing The New Americana. As a news aggregator, my goal is to do more than simply regurgitate the latest news and reactions, but to give that news a context and a vibrant canvass for you, the reader, to form educated and intelligent opinions.

Life is best when we know why we believe what we believe. It’s my mission at The New Americana to make it the place you go with your morning coffee and throughout the day for high quality, deep content. I hope you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I enjoy preparing it for you.

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Conservatism

A renewed call for prayers for our nation

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A renewed call for prayers for our nation

Prayer is a powerful thing. Whenever we give praise to our Father in Heaven and beseech Him for blessings, He hears us. He may not always grant us our wishes; he’s not a fictional genie. Our wishes are not His command. But He does hear us, and when the chorus of prayers for a particular event are strong, it is a benefit to the cause. Today, America needs prayers. Society is slipping into a state of decadence that only He can reverse.

We often rely on ourselves to get things done. Hard work and perseverance go a long way. We also often rely too heavily on our elected officials to do the right thing, but as solid as our constitutional republic is in form, it is beset by turmoil and and a rising anti-Biblical worldview that is pervading the collective consciousness of many Americans who aren’t even aware that it’s happening.

Sex and violence have been normalized as “entertainment.” More attention is often paid to our mobile devices than our children, who themselves are given mobile devices to keep them busy so we can spend more time on ours. Churches are becoming more progressive to keep up with changes in society. Meanwhile, other religions such as Islam, atheism, and transhumanism are growing dramatically.

On the political front, many Americans are becoming increasingly dependent on government and are embracing politicians who want to bring us all into a forced state of dependence. Washington DC in general has denied the wise tenets of federalism and gone for full-blown federal supremacy across the board. We have good people fighting for us in DC, but they are outnumbered and oftentimes overpowered by their cohorts, bureaucrats, and an activist judiciary that holds its own delusions of grandeur.

I find myself seeking solutions to America’s problems most hours of the day. It’s my job to analyze what’s happening in the news and decipher what it means to the American people. Then, I try to either side with the most righteous solutions or offer new ones of my own. In this daily cycle, I often lose sight of the true nature of this world. There is Divinity holding everything together, but there are also principalities and powers stacked against us.

Unfortunately, part of our weakness as humans means the allure of the anti-Biblical worldviews and the progressive mentality on governance ring wonderfully in our ears. We hear the call of evil forces and all-too-often it sounds appealing to us. It’s like candy to a child. They’ve been told eating their broccoli is better for them but they love the candy so much more.

America needs a few revivals. We need a revival both of the church and within the church. More people need to be attending as well as actively participating more than one day a week. Meanwhile, the churches themselves need to abandon the politically correct version of Bible teaching and focus on the truths of the text itself.

We need a revival of conservatism. Populism may be alive and well, and for now it’s an acceptable alternative to the evils of radical progressivism, but we must strive for a stronger adherence to the philosophies that are necessary to keep American exceptionalism alive and widespread throughout our nation. There are simply too many “RINOs” out there not realizing their pushes for political expediency are betrayals to America itself.

Above all else, the United States needs more citizens to pray for our nation. Pray for wisdom for our leaders. Pray for discernment among the people. Pray that more people will open their eyes to the truth of the Gospel and our hearts to the gift of Jesus Christ. We must keep fighting the good fight, but doing so mustn’t get in the way of praising and beseeching our Creator.

Perhaps Daniel did it best in his prayers to our Lord.

Through all of the existential threats brewing in and out of the worlds of politics and religion, there is one action that is undeniably positive: Prayer. If we start praying for our nation and have others pray for her as well, perhaps there really is hope.

We are currently forming the American Conservative Movement. If you are interested in learning more, we will be sending out information in a few weeks.

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Entertainment and Sports

HBO should can Bill Maher, but don’t hold your breath

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HBO should can Bill Maher but dont hold your breath

Until yesterday, I actually liked Bill Maher. I never agreed with his politics but he got an “entertainer’s pass” in my books as someone who can’t really do much to harm the political process and actually helps galvanize conservatives against the clear media bias mounted against us. But then he went to a new low, saying he was glad David Koch was head and hoped he died in pain.

It’s too far. Even if we disregard the fact that it’s disrespectful of Koch’s loved ones, the hideous nature of the comments makes it something we as a people should denounce. When Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies, which may be soon, I’m hopeful no notable conservatives act the way Maher did. If they do, I’ll condemn them just as quickly as I’m condemning Maher.

This behavior is beyond being a provocateur and HBO shouldn’t stand for it. But they will. In fact, they’ll probably support him. He’s good for subscriptions and espouses their collective ideology. Therefore, a toxic jab at a dead Libertarian is far from grounds for termination and may be grounds for added support from executives at HBO.

Here are some Twitter reactions:

People like Bill Maher have the gall to point at President Trump as a reason for the degradation of American society. It’s true that we’re losing our civility, but it’s mostly at the hands of progressives who have no respect for anything American.

We are currently forming the American Conservative Movement. If you are interested in learning more, we will be sending out information in a few weeks.

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Democrats

Desperate Beto O’Rourke repeats lie that Trump called KKK members ‘very fine people’

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Desperate Beto ORourke repeats lie that Trump called KKK members very fine people

A popular technique used by Nazis before and during WWII was to tell a big lie often and loudly. Their theory was if you tell the same lie over and over again, eventually it would be accepted as the truth. It’s ironic that Democrats like Beto O’Rourke are invoking this Nazi technique to tie President Trump to the KKK. It’s also quite sad as the once-high-flying progressive hero has fallen so far that he must rely on controversy just to stay relevant. His poll numbers are that bad.

His latest attempt to play the race card against anything and everyone who doesn’t agree with him has him repeating the tired old lie that has been perpetuated by mainstream media and propped up by social media. But even worse is the fact that some search engines are keeping stories accepting the false claims ranked higher than the fact check stories that debunk the claim.

Once and for all, President Trump did not call KKK members “very fine people.” During the Charlottsville protests, white supremacists were present. But also included in the crowd on the right were average citizens who were upset about the take down of American historical monuments. As the President noted and as has been verified by independent sources, these “very fine people” were among the white supremacists. It’s possible to support a goal but not hold the ideology of others who support the same goal. Just because I don’t want monuments taken down doesn’t mean I’m a white supremacist. I’m not even white.

Here is what the President actually said, with the extremely important last portion of his statement conveniently omitted from all progressive media reports. They took him out of context so blatantly and heinously because they NEED the people to believe he’s racist. Emphasis and bracketed notes have been added, since progressive media and Beto O’Rourke clearly lack reading comprehension skills.

“You had some very bad people in that group [referring to neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and KKK members]. But you also had people that were very fine people on both sides. You had people in that group that were there to protest the taking down of, to them, a very, very important statue and the renaming of a park from Robert E. Lee to another name… I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and white nationalists because they should be condemned totally.”

A plain-text reading of the President’s statement make O’Rourke’s recent Tweet either the product of his own stupidity or an unambiguous bald-face lie.

There are millions of Americans who disagree with President Trump over policies. There are some people who aren’t happy with his results so far. Both of these are open for proper discourse in the form of criticism, praise, or debate. But let’s try to keep the lies to a minimum. I understand the race card is all the Democrats have left, but they should try harder to make plans that work (or embrace the GOP’s plans that are already working) instead of stooping to name-calling and promoting false narratives.

There are only two possibilities. Either Beto O’Rourke is extremely unintelligent, lacking in basic reading comprehension skills, or he is a blatant liar so desperate for attention that he’ll say anything for a headline. He needs to be pitied.

We are currently forming the American Conservative Movement. If you are interested in learning more, we will be sending out information in a few weeks.

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