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Immigration

Trump’s ‘tent cities’ for asylum seekers will trigger some, but it’s brilliant

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Hardcore leftists want the impossible. In their open borders utopia, they imagine people coming to America at will and being given all the benefits of citizens. They want these benefits paid for by the rich (since in their world, the wealthy must pay for everyone else to live well). They want the red carpet treatment for anyone seeking asylum; give them a nice suburban home while they wait for their documents to be expedited to them.

Mothers, children, criminals, terrorists… all are welcome in leftist utopia.

What they don’t want is for people crossing the border and seeking asylum to be relocated to tents, fed sufficiently, schooled, medically treated, and given complete safety and shelter until their applications are processed and a judge hears their case. That’s cruelty in the eyes of most leftists.

It’s exactly what President Trump has planned and it’s brilliant.

In an interview last night on Ingraham Angle, the President addressed the migrant caravan issue. He said the difference is that in the past when the national guard was used to help border patrol capture illegal immigrants, they would be caught and released. This time, the President intends to catch and not release.

But he didn’t stop there. Host Laura Ingraham asked about asylum seekers. President Trump said, “If they apply for asylum we’re going to hold them until such time that their trial takes place.”

Ingraham asked where they would be kept if not released. The President told her his plan to keep those seeking asylum in “tent cities” where they’ll be held until their asylum trial.

“We’re going to build tent cities,” the President answered. “We’re going to put tents up all over the place. We’re not going to build structures and spend all of this, you know, hundreds of millions of dollars. We’re going to have tents, they’re going to be very nice, and they’re going to wait. And if they don’t get asylum, they get out.”

Ingraham noted that 80% of asylum seekers get rejected.

This plan is very different from anything we’ve seen in the past. When people apply for asylum, they are normally processed and released while they await trial, which can take years. When their trial date comes up, many of them do not appear. That’s one of the loopholes that has allowed millions of illegal immigrants to get embedded in our country. According to President Trump, that won’t be the case for this migrant caravan.

He also mentioned a separate benefit to handling it all this way. Once word spreads that the asylum seekers weren’t processed and released while awaiting trial, fewer will attempt to take advantage of the loophole.

The President will take flack from the left for not treating these people with respect and he’ll probably take some flack from the right for being too soft on them, but this is the best plan anyone has had on the issue. It makes sense for protecting our borders as a sovereign nation while not abandoning the needs of those who are truly in danger of oppression, persecution, extreme poverty, or violence.

Closing the loophole many illegal immigrants attempt to use through asylum policies will drastically reduce attempts to circumvent our laws. If they truly need asylum, they’ll come. If they don’t there’s no longer a benefit to trying for it. Well done.

Immigration

Tijuana protesters chant ‘Out!’ at migrants camped in city

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Tijuana protesters chant Out at migrants camped in city

TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) — Hundreds of Tijuana residents congregated around a monument in an affluent section of the city south of California on Sunday to protest the thousands of Central American migrants who have arrived via caravan in hopes of a new life in the U.S.

Tensions have built as nearly 3,000 migrants from the caravan poured into Tijuana in recent days after more than a month on the road, and with many more months ahead of them while they seek asylum. The federal government estimates the number of migrants could soon swell to 10,000.

U.S. border inspectors are processing only about 100 asylum claims a day at Tijuana’s main crossing to San Diego. Asylum seekers register their names in a tattered notebook managed by migrants themselves that had more than 3,000 names even before the caravan arrived.

On Sunday, displeased Tijuana residents waved Mexican flags, sang the Mexican national anthem and chanted “Out! Out!” in front of a statue of the Aztec ruler Cuauhtemoc, 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) from the U.S. border. They accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana. They also complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an “invasion.” And they voiced worries that their taxes might be spent to care for the group.

“We don’t want them in Tijuana,” protesters shouted.

Juana Rodriguez, a housewife, said the government needs to conduct background checks on the migrants to make sure they don’t have criminal records.

A woman who gave her name as Paloma lambasted the migrants, who she said came to Mexico in search of handouts. “Let their government take care of them,” she told video reporters covering the protest.

A block away, fewer than a dozen Tijuana residents stood with signs of support for the migrants. Keila Samarron, a 38-year-old teacher, said the protesters don’t represent her way of thinking as she held a sign saying: Childhood has no borders.

Most of the migrants who have reached Tijuana via caravan in recent days set out more than a month ago from Honduras, a country of 9 million people. Dozens of migrants in the caravan who have been interviewed by Associated Press reporters have said they left their country after death threats.

But the journey has been hard, and many have turned around.

Alden Rivera, the Honduran ambassador in Mexico, told the AP on Saturday that 1,800 Hondurans have returned to their country since the caravan first set out on Oct. 13, and that he hopes more will make that decision. “We want them to return to Honduras,” said Rivera.

Honduras has a murder rate of 43 per 100,000 residents, similar to U.S. cities like New Orleans and Detroit. In addition to violence, migrants in the caravan have mentioned poor economic prospects as a motivator for their departures. Per capita income hovers around $120 a month in Honduras, where the World Bank says two out of three people live in poverty.

The migrants’ expected long stay in Tijuana has raised concerns about the ability of the border city of more than 1.6 million people to handle the influx.

While many in Tijuana are sympathetic to the migrants’ plight and trying to assist, some locals have shouted insults, hurled rocks and even thrown punches at them. The cold reception contrasts sharply with the warmth that accompanied the migrants in southern Mexico, where residents of small towns greeted them with hot food, campsites and even live music.

Tijuana Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum has called the migrants’ arrival an “avalanche” that the city is ill-prepared to handle, calculating that they will be in Tijuana for at least six months as they wait to file asylum claims. Gastelum has appealed to the federal government for more assistance to cope with the influx.

Mexico’s Interior Ministry said Saturday that the federal government was flying in food and blankets for the migrants in Tijuana.

Tijuana officials converted a municipal gymnasium and recreational complex into a shelter to keep migrants out of public spaces. The city’s privately run shelters have a maximum capacity of 700. The municipal complex can hold up to 3,000.

At the municipal shelter, Josue Caseres, 24, expressed dismay at the protests against the caravan. “We are fleeing violence,” said the entertainer from Santa Barbara, Honduras. “How can they think we are going to come here to be violent?”

Some from the caravan have diverted to other border cities, such as Mexicali, a few hours to the east of Tijuana.

U.S. President Donald Trump, who sought to make the caravan a campaign issue in the midterm elections, used Twitter on Sunday to voice support for the mayor of Tijuana and try to discourage the migrants from seeking entry to the U.S.

Trump wrote that like Tijuana, “the U.S. is ill-prepared for this invasion, and will not stand for it. They are causing crime and big problems in Mexico. Go home!”

He followed that tweet by writing: “Catch and Release is an obsolete term. It is now Catch and Detain. Illegal Immigrants trying to come into the U.S.A., often proudly flying the flag of their nation as they ask for U.S. Asylum, will be detained or turned away.”

___

Guthrie reported from Mexico City. Associated Press writer Julie Watson contributed to this story from Tijuana.

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Immigration

Several injured as first wave of migrant caravan clashes with Mexicans in Tijuana

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Several injured as first wave of migrant caravan clashes with Mexican citizens in Tijuana

A portion of the first migrant caravan has arrived at the border city of Tijuana, Mexico. Their first night there resulted in violent clashes with residents that resulted in several injuries, including three journalists.

This group of around 750 migrants is the largest to reach the border. City and Baja California state officials set up shelters to accommodate the visitors, but nearly half of the migrants left, preferring to sleep out in the open. Most gathered on the beach near the United States border where they were met by residents demanding they return to the shelters.

“The message to the migrant population is very clear,” Francisco Rueda Gómez, secretary-general of the state of Baja California. “We are providing them with humanitarian support, health care and food, however the need to take into consideration the rules of the shelters so they can coexist in harmony with the local population.”

This marks the first test of how migrants will react to their situation now that the journey is over and the waiting begins. They could be in Tijuana for months. Their first night didn’t go as planned.

Around 3,000 more migrants are on their way to bolster their numbers at the border city.

My Take

Some of the migrants were interviewed by media and seemed confused they weren’t embraced with open arms. They were cheered on in other cities they’d passed through on their way to the border, but Tijuana is reacting differently.

The reason is obvious. It’s easy to cheer on people who are passing through. It’s more difficult to cheer for people who are going to be living near you for an extended period of time, especially when they scoff at the free shelter, food, and services they are being given on their first night.

If things are this bad on the first night with a few hundred migrants arriving, what will happen when they’re reunited with other factions from the original caravan? Things may get ugly very quickly in Tijuana.

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Guns and Crime

Luis Cobos-Cenobio, the star of the Arkansas dashcam shootout, is an illegal immigrant

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Luis Cobos-Cenobio the star of the Arkansas dash cam shootout is an illegal immigrant

It’s an odd headline. The lede in this story should the shocking dashcam footage showing suspect Luis Cobos-Cenobio firing on police who were trying to pull him over. Unfortunately, immigration status is either buried or ignored altogether by mainstream media, so we thought it was necessary to point out up front that the man who allegedly tried to shoot and kill police officers is an illegal immigrant.

You can read the details at Fox News, one of the only outlets I’ve found so far that mentions his immigration status:

Dashcam video shows moment illegal immigrant suspect opens fire on Arkansas police officer

https://www.foxnews.com/us/dashcam-video-shows-moment-illegal-immigrant-suspect-opens-fire-on-arkansas-police-officerCobos-Cenobio has been jailed on $500,000 bond, and has had a detainer placed on him by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, an agency spokesperson confirmed to Fox News.

Cobos-Cenobio has been charged with four counts of attempted capital murder, committing a terroristic act, fleeing, possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to police.

If he is convicted on any or all of these charges, he’s going to jail for a long time. There’s no way to know at this point how many Americans he’s harmed in the past. Sadly, as a criminal illegal immigrant, there’s no reason for him to be here in the first place.

Mainstream media doesn’t want you to know that part of the story, though. Some went so far as to avoid the topic altogether.

For example, this article from ABC News is nearly 400-words in length and never even hints at his immigration status. Many stories simply noted as deep into the article as possible that he had a “federal hold” or “detainer request” without indicating that almost certainly means he’s here illegally.

Mainstream media is desperate to bury or cover up anything that pertains to illegal immigrants. This story, with its amazing and terrifying video, was too “good” for them to pass up. That didn’t stop them from hiding his immigration status.

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