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Omarosa releases recording of her firing, looks worse as a result

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Omarosa releases recording of her firing looks worse as a result

When the headline came across the wire that Omarosa Manigault-Newman released a secret recording of her firing, most expected it to have some dirt on Chief of Staff John Kelly or even President Trump. It definitely had dirt. Unfortunately for her, it was all on her.

The goal of releasing the tape was allegedly to clear her name of reports she stormed through the White House setting off alarms and had to be removed physically by the Secret Service. It was a story that most probably forgot about until now. Then, it was revealed in the tape that she was fired over serious “integrity issues.”

Here’s the important portion of the video.

Even leftist journalist Chuck Todd had to point out there’s nothing out of the ordinary with a Chief of Staff running the staff, as they’re supposed to do.

 

One portion the media is latching onto for headlines is her claim that President Trump is “mentally declined.”

This will likely help her sell more books, of course. But the cost to her own reputation is making it difficult to believe this was a good move in the long term. NY Post columnist Karol Markowicz summed the whole Omarosa ordeal up nicely in one Tweet:

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Is Newt Gingrich the perfect Chief of Staff for President Trump?

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Is Newt Gingrich the perfect Chief of Staff for President Trump

Rumors are flying following a visit to the White House by former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and subsequent reports that he’s now at the top of President Trump’s Chief of Staff wishlist. If true, it’s not the safe pick that Nick Ayers would have been had he been willing to take the job. It’s not the prudent pick that Representative Mark Meadows would have been if he wasn’t more useful to the President on Capitol Hill. It would be the crazy, controversial, big splash pick that many had expected from the President’s cabinet when he was first sworn into office.

It may be the perfect pick at the perfect time for President Trump.

Right now, the President is building his reelection team. Make no mistake, everyone who is replaced as well as their replacements for the next year will be decided upon based on how well they can help the President win reelection. That’s standard practice in the White House, though some would argue these picks were supposed to be made from the beginning and not two years later, but this isn’t your parents’ White House.

Gingrich brings an extreme wealth of political knowledge to the table. It’s hard to find anyone who understands better how to navigate every political map in DC from Capitol Hill to special interest groups to the White House staff itself. Few have ever doubted his credentials. The problems with Gingrich have often circled around his private life. A President whose private life is already under attack may be the only one who could bring in a man like Gingrich.

Reactions on Twitter were as expected.

My Take

I may be biased since he was my pick for the GOP nomination in 2012, but I’m glad to see Gingrich in the mix. I would have rather seen Meadows in the role, but the President knows what the President knows.

This could all be a smokescreen to keep us focused on something other than Michael Cohen and the National Enquirer. Or it could just be more rampant unsubstantiated rumors cooked up by those who want to seem like they’re in the know. One would expect the President to Tweet about this right about now if it’s real.

I know every Democrat and a lot of Republicans would be against it, but I would love to see Newt Gingrich as Chief of Staff. He’s one of the smartest people in DC and would challenge the President when appropriate. We’ll know soon enough.

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Baby of Hanukkah terror victims pronounced dead

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Baby of Hanukkah terror victims pronounced dead

The young couple had the chance to meet their son, Tinok (“baby”) ben Shira Yael.

 The baby son of Amichai and Shira-Ish Ran, delivered by emergency Caesarean section at just 30 weeks, was pronounced dead on Wednesday, according to a statement by the Shaare Zedek Medical Center.

The young couple had the chance to meet their son, Tinok (“baby”) ben Shira Yael.

His 21-year-old mother remains hospitalized in stable condition after surgery. She was shot on Sunday night—the last night of Hanukkah—by Palestinian terrorists, along with her husband, who was also shot several times but has been reported to be recovering, and five other people at a bus stop near the town of Ofra in Samaria.

Shira and Amichai Ish-Ran married eight months ago and moved to Elon Moreh. Shira is studying education at Orot Israel College in Elkana, and Amichai is a yeshivah student in Elon Moreh.

“Our hearts are with Shira and Amichai on the loss of their 4-day-old baby who does not even have a name,” said Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at an event in Israel on Wednesday night. “These despicable murderers are the most despicable criminals on earth. The security forces are pursuing the murderers. I hope that there will be news on this soon. We will not rest until we have found them and brought them to justice.”

Education Minister Naftali Bennett called the death a tragedy, writing on Facebook: “Our heart is with Shira and Amichai, the heart cries out.”

According to The Jerusalem Post, the baby would be laid to rest on Wednesday night at the Mount of Olives Jewish Cemetery.

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UK’s May wins no-confidence vote by MPs unhappy over Brexit

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UKs May wins no-confidence vote by MPs unhappy over Brexit

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May survived a political crisis over her Brexit deal Wednesday, winning a no-confidence vote by Conservative lawmakers that would have ended her leadership of party and country.

But the margin of victory — 200 votes to 117 — leaves May a weakened leader who has lost the support of a big chunk of her party over her handling of Britain’s exit from the European Union. It also came at a steep price as she promised not to run for re-election in 2022. Britain’s Brexit problem, meanwhile, remains unsolved as May seeks changes to her EU divorce deal in order to make it more palatable to Parliament.

May said she was “pleased to have received the backing of my colleagues” but acknowledged that “a significant number” had voted against her in Wednesday evening’s secret ballot.

“I have listened to what they said,” May promised as she stood in a darkened Downing St. after what she called a “long and challenging day.”

The threat to May had been building as pro-Brexit Conservative lawmakers grew increasingly frustrated with the prime minister’s handling of Brexit. Many supporters of Brexit say May’s deal, a compromise that retains close economic ties with the EU, fails to deliver on the clean break with the bloc that they want.

The balloting came after May’s Conservative opponents, who circled the beleaguered prime minister for weeks hoping to spark a no-confidence vote, finally got the numbers they needed to call one.

The vote was triggered when at least 48 lawmakers —15 percent of Conservative legislators — wrote letters asking for a no-confidence ballot.

On Monday, May postponed a vote to approve the divorce deal to avoid all-but-certain defeat. She has until Jan. 21 to bring it back to Parliament after— she hopes — winning concessions from the EU.

The result of the vote was announced to loud cheers from lawmakers gathered in a stuffy, ornately wallpapered room in the House of Commons. Under party rules, May cannot be challenged again by fellow Conservatives for a year.

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling, an ally, said the result showed that May “has the support of her party.”

“This is a clear statement by the parliamentary party they want her to go forward, they want her to lead us through Brexit,” he told Sky News.

But pro-Brexit lawmaker Mark Francois said the result was “devastating” for May, who has lost the support of a third of her party in Parliament.

“If I were her, I wouldn’t be pleased with this at all,” Francois said. “I think she needs to think very carefully about what to do now.”

Before the vote Wednesday, May had vowed to fight for the leadership of her party and the country “with everything I’ve got,” and spent the day holed up in the House of Commons trying to win over enough lawmakers to secure victory.

In a bid to win over wavering lawmakers, May indicated she would step down before the next election, due in 2022.

Solicitor-General Robert Buckland said May told lawmakers at a meeting that “it is not her intention to lead the party in the 2022 general election.”

May’s victory is a reprieve but does not lay to rest uncertainty about Britain’s EU departure, due on March 29.

Opposition lawmakers expressed astonishment and outrage at the Conservative civil war erupting in the middle of the fraught Brexit process.

“This government is a farce, the Tory party is in chaos, the prime minister is a disgrace,” Scottish National Party leader Ian Blackford said during a pugnacious Prime Minister’s Questions session in the House of Commons.

British business figures expressed exasperation at the continuing political uncertainty.

“With news that the prime minister remains in place, business communities will hope that these political games can finally be put to bed,” said Adam Marshall, director general of the British Chambers of Commerce.

“Westminster must now focus all its energy on urgently giving businesses clarity on the future and avoiding a messy or disorderly Brexit.”

The vote confirms May’s reputation as a dogged, determined political survivor. But on Thursday she will head to an EU summit in Brussels facing another difficult task. She is seeking changes to the withdrawal agreement that can win support in Britain’s Parliament. But EU leaders say the legally binding text won’t be reopened, and the best they can offer are “clarifications.”

May said she would “be seeking legal and political assurances that will assuage the concerns” of lawmakers.

Among EU leaders there is sympathy for May’s predicament — but also exasperation at Britain’s political mess.

The European Parliament’s Brexit point man, Guy Verhofstadt, could not contain a note of annoyance, tweeting: “Once again, the fate of EU-U.K. relations, the prosperity of businesses & citizens’ rights are consumed by an internal Conservative party catfight over Europe.”

On the streets of London, some felt sympathy for the embattled leader.

“It’s embarrassing for a start to the rest of the world and I feel really sorry for Theresa May — she’s being battered by everybody,” said Abby Handbridge, who was selling Christmas cards and wrapping paper at a London street market.

“I hope she stays in power and sorts it out.”

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Follow AP’s full coverage of Brexit crisis at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit

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Associated Press writers Danica Kirka, Jo Kearney and Gregory Katz in London contributed.

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