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Guns and Crime

The only thing that can save Chicago’s high-crime areas is a wholesale change of leadership

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The only thing that can save Chicagos high-crime areas is a wholesale change of leadership

Oftentimes the solution to a problem is to wipe the slate clean and start over. That seems to be the case in gang-infested regions of Chicago where gun violence erupted last weekend. The result was 72 people shot, at least a dozen fatally, and zero arrests as of Wednesday with the 72-hour window of highest opportunity to catch the criminals has closed.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel and his office have failed from the start. They’ve tried different tactics, new police chiefs, getting tough, getting nice, and everything in between. Their failures have been well-documented for years but this weekend’s explosion of violence punctuates the need for a wholesale change.

There are other solutions proposed by other journalists and some should be noted:

Why Chicago can’t get a handle on deadly shootings

https://nypost.com/2018/08/08/why-chicago-cant-get-a-handle-on-deadly-shootings/In other words, there were six “mass shootings,” according to the increasingly common definition of that term, in Chicago in just three days. The Windy City’s weekend violence has not received anywhere near the level of national attention that would have been generated had those “mass shootings” occurred at suburban high schools, malls or movie theaters.

Calls for stricter gun-control laws follow every high-profile mass shooting; the weekend’s carnage in Chicago prompted similar demands from civic leaders and pundits. Yet the city has strict gun laws, and even when police enforce those laws diligently, the city’s liberal anti-gun caucus doesn’t always back them up.

Homicides: Why Chicago residents don’t help police solve shootings

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/08/07/chicago-gun-violence-homicide-clearance/925630002/At the hospital, police asked Young, 23, to tell them who shot him, but he said he declined to name the assailant. Weeks after the April incident, Young — who has a long arrest record and a felony conviction for drug possession — was charged for illegal possession of a firearm, when police said they caught him on the street with a weapon.

Young’s no-snitching outlook sheds light on the complicated dynamic in Chicago’s neighborhoods plagued by persistent gun violence, one in which few residents are willing to assist police and even fewer perpetrators are held accountable.

Chicago police solve one in every 20 shootings. Here are some reasons why that’s so low.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-met-chicago-violence-clearance-rate-20180807-story.htmlAt the news conference Monday, Johnson acknowledged that the department has trust issues to overcome in neighborhoods hit hardest by violence.

A report by the U.S. Department of Justice early last year found that police officers had routinely engaged in widespread civil-rights violations, particularly in the African-American community, and acknowledged that resentment had built up for decades.

More Chicago officers deployed to areas affected by…

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6037303/More-Chicago-officers-deployed-areas-affected-violence.htmlHundreds of additional police officers are being deployed to Chicago city neighborhoods where 12 people were killed and dozens more were injured in a weekend of violence and gunfire.

Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said 400 additional officers are already patrolling areas on the West and South Sides where more than 70 shootings occurred. Another 200 will be added by the coming weekend.

While all of these analyses have some points of merit, nobody’s pointing to the obvious solution. Emanuel and his staff need to go. Whether the violence is their fault or not is debatable, but what’s not debatable is they’ve completely failed to contain it. Perhaps this violence would be happening regardless of who’s in the mayor’s mansion, but one thing is certain: as long as Emanuel is there, the violence will continue.

Chicago needs a tough mayor, one who is willing to dismiss his or her own political capital in order to get the job done. That means doing what may be political suicide but that makes the streets of Chicago safer for everyone. As crazy as it sounds, Chicago needs someone other than a bleeding-heart liberal to get back on track.

It’s time for Emanuel to step down or get evicted. His failures are clear. His incompetence is glaring. Chicago is becoming unlivable. As one of America’s greatest cities, it cannot be allowed to crumble the way it’s been doing for years. They need a change.

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Guns and Crime

Alexander Acosta is the swamp

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Alexander Acosta is the swamp

Billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein served 13 months in prison. His deal brought no justice to his victims who were not even informed until after the deal was made. He was protected from federal prosecution and given every amenity possible during his stay in a private wing of his prison. All of this was made possible by Alexander Acosta, the current Labor Secretary in the Trump administration.

Epstein may have escaped justice, but Acosta should not be allowed to escape repercussions for his part in the Epstein deal. If the President ever really had intentions of draining the swamp, he should start by firing Acosta immediately.

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Guns and Crime

The Russian investigation was never about Russia. It was cover to find dirt on the President.

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The Russian investigation was never about Russia It was cover to find dirt on the President

President Trump is almost certainly never going to be caught committing the types of crimes that initially prompted the Russia investigation led by special counsel Robert Mueller. That was never the goal of the investigation. It was a cover story concocted to give Mueller unimpeded access to the President and his staff.

As I’ve said on multiple occasions, the Russian collusion angle was simply an excuse to justify digging into the affairs of the President, his campaign staff, and everyone associated with them. They knew the chances of finding true collusion were slim, but they needed a reason to try to uncover potentially impeachable offenses. Now, Democrats and mainstream media think they’ve found them in the form of hush money paid to porn star Stormy Daniels and Playboy bunny Karen McDougal.

The sentencing recommendation documents for Michael Cohen, the President’s former attorney, revealed the investigation is now focused on proving that “Individual-1” ordered the hush money be paid to cover up affairs the President had with the two women. Many experts, including Trump supporters like Chris Christy and Andrew McCarthy, believe there’s a case that can be made against President Trump for campaign finance violations.

There are two questions that must be answered. Did candidate Trump order Michael Cohen to pay hush money? If he did, was it a violation of campaign finance laws?

The answer to the first one is almost certainly yes. It’s hard to imagine Cohen acting on his own. In fact, it’s ludicrous to think that Trump, who is known for micromanaging his affairs, would not be made aware of any threats or perceived threats of these women at the height of the campaign.

The second question has a murkier answer. Arguments can be made in both directions. Was it an effort to stifle potentially damaging revelations that could hurt the campaign? Yes. Was it a personal matter, in which case paying off people for their silence is not against the law? Yes.

The timing of the payoffs may be the best argument the prosecution will be able to make to demonstrate these were campaign finance violations. Because these would be considered damaging to the campaign, one can easily make the connection that they were intended to influence the outcome of the election. On the other hand, the argument can also be made that the threats came out because of the election, but the decision to pay hush money was a personal one. This could be easily corroborated if past payments were revealed.

The President has a sure-fire way to disprove campaign finance violations, but he won’t like it

http://noqreport.com/2018/12/09/president-sure-fire-way-disprove-campaign-finance-violations-wont-like/By showing past payoffs to women, the President can go with the story that he didn’t want to damage his marriage or business dealings. This play might hurt his reputation, but it would likely quash attempts to indict him.

This is all assuming there were past payoffs. If there weren’t, then it would be difficult for his defense to claim the two payoffs in question were not politically motivated.

It may not be the most elegant solution for the President, but if the investigation continues to build a case that he committed campaign finance violations, he may have no choice but to reveal past payoffs that show he’s immoral, but not a criminal.

If President Trump never paid hush money to women before announcing his candidacy, then he’s truly in a pickle. It’s hard to argue this was a personal issue devoid of political motivations because his past is checkered with scandals that mirror or even supersede such claims. Most damaging is the fact that he’s bragged about affairs in books he’s published.

The President’s opponents were willing to take him down regardless of the cost. That’s why they concocted the Russia collusion investigation in the first place. This whole mess stinks and will be a stain on our political system for years to come.

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Guns and Crime

The President has a sure-fire way to disprove campaign finance violations, but he won’t like it

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The President has a sure-fire way to disprove campaign finance violations but he wont like it

As the President becomes more embroiled in Michael Cohen’s payoffs to porn star Stormy Daniels and Playboy bunny Karen McDougal, it’s becoming increasingly likely he will be indicted for campaign finance violations. While it’s unlikely this will affect his first term as President, it could mean charges are brought against him the moment he’s no longer in office. This could also add fuel to the fire for Democrats to win in 2020, as it would open the door for charges to be filed.

There’s a way the President can stop the charges before they’re filed, but it’s a step the President likely won’t want to take. If he has paid hush money to other women in the past, before he announced his run for President, he can demonstrate the hush money was paid to protect his personal reputation. If that’s the case, then this no longer falls under campaign finance laws.

It isn’t illegal to pay hush money to people.

The case that prosecutors will try to make is that then-candidate Trump ordered his attorney, Cohen, to facilitate payments to women whose stories could damage his chances of winning the 2016 presidential election. If they can prove that the President ordered the payoffs, they then have to prove the reason for the payoffs was to influence the election.

By showing past payoffs to women, the President can go with the story that he didn’t want to damage his marriage or business dealings. This play might hurt his reputation, but it would likely quash attempts to indict him.

This is all assuming there were past payoffs. If there weren’t, then it would be difficult for his defense to claim the two payoffs in question were not politically motivated.

It may not be the most elegant solution for the President, but if the investigation continues to build a case that he committed campaign finance violations, he may have no choice but to reveal past payoffs that show he’s immoral, but not a criminal.

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