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Conservative picks for the Tennessee primary

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Conservative picks for the Tennessee primary

Tennessee breaks up the monotony of most of the Southern states that hopelessly elect RINOs to power. Conservatism has the potential to make gains in Tennessee particularly thanks to vacated seats courtesy of Marsha Blackburn running for Senate and Dianne Black running for Governor. Marsha Blackburn represents a particularly strong possibility of reinforcing outnumbered Conservatives in the Senate. She does, however have a strong Democratic candidate to eventually face in Phil Bredesen. Bredesen has a fairly strong reputation for a Democrat in Tennessee and will likely be a Joe Manchin in the Senate. Marsha Blackburn will have no easy task in keeping the seat red. Of course, all this assumes that both these candidates advance in their party primaries.

Best Picks: Marsha Blackburn, Todd McKinley
Worst Picks: Phil Roe, Chuck Fleischmann, John Rose
Best Race: TNSen, District 2
Worst Race: District 6

TNSen

On the GOP side, its a battle between Marsha Blackburn and Aaron Petigrew. All signs point to a smooth nomination for the Trump endorse Blackburn. Blackburn represents a shift for Trump. Donald Trump has endorsed RINOs in almost every Senate race he has wielded an endorsement in. See Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Utah, Pennsylvania, and Missouri for references. In contrast, in races where a solid Conservative is running, Trump’s endorsement is no where to be found. See West Virginia, MaineMontana, Virginia, and New Mexico for references. Marsha Blackburn is a step in a Conservative direction for Trump’s campaign. Her record in the House is well above average. She boasts a Liberty Score of 80 with a strong record of fiscal responsibility and a decent one at individual liberties.

Conservative Pick: Marsha Blackburn

District 1

Phil Roe is the incumbent. After a decade in DC, he has an F Liberty Score, and all signs of fiscal irresponsibility. His most serious challenger is Todd McKinley. McKinley is a strong conservative, particularly on life, 2nd Amendment, and spending. He is also a decent campaigner in comparison to most other challengers.

Conservative Pick Todd McKinley

District 2

This is a good field of candidates. The strongest of which are Jimmy MatlockJason Emert, and Tim Burchett. Jimmy Matlock has the support of the House Freedom Caucus. Meanwhile Jason Emert has Ted Cruz’s endorsements. Matlock has a very strong emphasis on fiscal responsibility which separates the Conservatives from the RINOs in the House. Emert ‘s stance on the issues also provides heavy emphasis on Conservative principles. These two candidates would both make decent Congressmen. Matlock is a slightly stronger Candidate with a more likable background. Burchett is the least upfront with regards to issues. But he does have a sense of humor.

Conservative Pick: Jimmy Matlock

District 3

Chuck Fleischmann is a RINO who’s been in for too long. His most serious opponent is Jeremy Massengale who is a decent Conservative by the looks.

Conservative Picks: Jeremy Massengale

District 4

Scott DesJarlais is the most Conservative Congressman out of Tennessee. His record is solid.

Conservative Pick: Scott DesJarlais

District 5

Jody Ball is the most serious contender. Confidence low on his Conservatism.

Conservative Pick: Jody Ball

District 6

This is another seat without an incumbent. The House Freedom Caucus is looking to advance Judd Matheny against the big money candidate in Bob Corlew. Corlew has a life time of service to the state while also boasting a Conservative platform. It appears he is not the villain in this race. That title belongs to the John Rose, an all around political insider for Tennessee politics. He has the backing of prominent local Democrats as well as a weaker record on Conservatism than the other two. Judd Matheny is likely the best candidate, but Bob Corlew might be the be most in position to keep John Rose out.

Conservative Pick: Toss Up

District 7

Mark Green is the only Republican in this race.

District 8

After one term David Kustoff has proven to be a RINO. David Kustoff advanced in a 13 candidate Republican primary two years ago to capture this West Tennessee seat, winning with only 27 percent of the vote. This primary will test whether Kustoff, has coalesced local Republicans behind him. This race is by no means in the bag for him as it often is for any other incumbents. Unfortunately for the district’s Conservatives, Trump has had this much to say on the race.

He has two challengers: Dr. George Flynn Jr. and Colleen Owens. Of the two, Owens is by far the more balanced conservative while Flynn is running on the single issue of healthcare, and not even from the most conservative standpoint, as he has mentioned opposition to a full repeal of Obamacare in one sitting.

Conservative Pick: Colleen Owens

District 9

Charlotte Bergmann is the only Republican in this race.

 

 

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Our YouTube channel has launched and it’s so much fun

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Our YouTube channel has launched and its so much fun

Everyone discovers something amazing later than they probably should have. I had a friend who was in his late 30s before he tried an In ‘n Out burger despite living in southern California his whole life. He probably never would have tried it until he hired a former manager at the restaurant chain who said he still eats there weekly despite working there for years. This made my friend curious and he kicked himself for passing up on trying the delicious burgers for decades.

When we first launched NOQ Report last year, one of the guys advising me about it recommended accompanying the articles with videos. He thought if we put together a proper YouTube channel and possibly even a podcast, we could add a totally different dimension and reach a separate audience. I declined for over a year because I was worried it would take too much time.

I was right, but it doesn’t matter. After putting out four videos in three days, I’m hooked.

There’s a completely different mentality when researching a topic for video. I’m forced to be more precise with my words because I can’t simply link out to other references as I can with articles. I have to explain it all, and while I thought it would be an announce, it turns out that it actually makes things easier. I can explain the details of something much more easily by speaking about it than trying to write it or reference others. That’s the beauty of video. It’s more of a direct recording of thoughts when speaking into a microphone instead of typing on a keyboard.

Now that we’re producing videos, we need subscribers. Please head over to our YouTube channel, hit subscribe, and be sure to hit the little bell to receive alerts at well.

Here are the four videos we’ve made so far. Please leave us feedback on how to improve as well as topics you’d like us to cover in the future.

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Immigration

Little if any progress as partial government shutdown looms

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Little if any progress as partial government shutdown looms

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fight over President Donald Trump’s $5 billion wall funds has deepened, threatening a partial government shutdown in a standoff that has become increasingly common in Washington.

It wasn’t always like this, with Congress and the White House at a crisis over government funding. The House and Senate used to pass annual appropriation bills, and the president signed them into law. But in recent years the shutdown scenario has become so routine that it raises the question: Have shutdowns as a negotiating tool lost their punch?

Monday brought few signs of progress. A partial shutdown that could occur at midnight Friday risks disrupting government operations and leaving hundreds of thousands of federal employees furloughed or working without pay over the holiday season. Costs would be likely in the billions of dollars.

Trump was meeting with his team and getting regular updates, said White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Trump was also tweeting Monday to keep up the pressure.

Exiting a Senate Republican leadership meeting late Monday, Sen. John Thune of South Dakota said, “It looks like it probably is going to have to build for a few days here before there’s a solution.”

The president is insisting on $5 billion for the wall along the southern border with Mexico, but he does not have the votes from the Republican-led Congress to support it. Democrats are offering to continue funding at current levels, $1.3 billion, not for the wall but for fencing and other border security.

It’s unclear how many House Republicans, with just a few weeks left in the majority before relinquishing power to House Democrats, will even show up midweek for possible votes. Speaker Paul Ryan’s office had no update. Many Republicans say it’s up to Trump and Democrats to cut a deal.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Trump talk most days, but the senator’s spokesman would not confirm if they spoke Monday about a plan. McConnell opened the chamber hoping for a “bipartisan collaborative spirit” that would enable Congress to finish its work.

“We need to make a substantial investment in the integrity of our border,” McConnell said. “And we need to close out the year’s appropriation process.”

Meanwhile more than 800,000 government workers are preparing for the uncertainty ahead.

The dispute could affect nine of 15 Cabinet-level departments and dozens of agencies, including the departments of Homeland Security, Transportation, Interior, Agriculture, State and Justice, as well as national parks and forests.

About half the workers would be forced to continue working without immediate pay. Others would be sent home. Congress often approves their pay retroactively, even if they were ordered to stay home.

“Our members are asking how they are supposed to pay for rent, food, and gas if they are required to work without a paycheck,” said a statement from J. David Cox, Sr., president of the American Federation of Government Employees, the large federal worker union. “The holiday season makes these inquiries especially heart-wrenching.”

Many agencies, including the Pentagon and the departments of Veterans Affairs and Health and Human Services, are already funded for the year and will continue to operate as usual, regardless of whether Congress and the president reach agreement this week.

Congress already approved funding this year for about 75 percent of the government’s discretionary account for the budget year that began Oct. 1.

The U.S. Postal Service, busy delivering packages for the holiday season, wouldn’t be affected by any government shutdown because it’s an independent agency.

Trump said last week he would be “proud” to have a shutdown to get Congress to approve a $5 billion down payment to fulfill his campaign promise to build a border wall.

During his 2016 presidential campaign, Trump promised that Mexico would pay for the wall. Mexico has refused.

Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, in a meeting last week at the White House, suggested keeping funding at its current level, $1.3 billion, for improved fencing. Trump had neither accepted nor rejected the Democrats’ offer, telling them he would take a look.

Schumer said Monday he had yet to hear from Trump. Speaking on the Senate floor, Schumer warned that “going along with the Trump shutdown is a futile act” because House Democrats would quickly approve government funding in January.

“President Trump still doesn’t have a plan to keep the government open,” Schumer said Monday. “No treat or temper tantrum will get the president his wall.”

One option for lawmakers would be to provide stopgap funding for a few weeks, until the new Congress convenes Jan. 3, when Pelosi is poised to become House speaker.

Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso, who is in line to become the No. 3 Republican in the Senate, suggested a stopgap bill could be one way to resolve the issue or a longer-term bill that includes money for border security.

GOP leaders, though, were frustrated as the clock ticked away. Leaving the weekly leadership meeting, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said any planning was a “very closely held thing. That’s why we should never let this happen. We should pass the bills the way we’re supposed to pass them.”

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Associated Press writer Laurie Kellman in Washington contributed to this report.

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Entertainment and Sports

Missouri poacher ordered to repeatedly watch ‘Bambi’

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Missouri poacher ordered to repeatedly watch Bambi

OZARKS, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri poacher has been ordered to repeatedly watch the movie “Bambi” as part of his sentence in a scheme to illegally kill hundreds of deer.

David Berry Jr. was ordered to watch the Disney classic at least once a month during his year-long jail sentence in what conservation agents have called one of the largest deer poaching cases in state history, the Springfield News-Leader reports .

“The deer were trophy bucks taken illegally, mostly at night, for their heads, leaving the bodies of the deer to waste,” said Don Trotter, the prosecuting attorney in Lawrence County.

Berry, his father, two brothers and another man who helped them had their hunting, fishing and trapping privileges revoked temporarily or permanently. The men have paid a combined $51,000 in fines and court costs — but the judge ordered a special addition to Berry’s sentence for illegally taking wildlife.

Court records show he was ordered by Lawrence County Judge Robert George to “view the Walt Disney movie Bambi, with the first viewing being on or before December 23, 2018, and at least one such viewing each month thereafter” while at the county jail.

Berry was also sentenced to 120 days in jail in nearby Barton County for a firearms probation violation.

His father, David Berry Sr., and his brother, Kyle Berry, were arrested in August after a nearly nine-month investigation that also involved cases in Kansas, Nebraska and Canada. The Missouri Department of Conservation said information from the investigation led to 14 Missouri residents facing more than 230 charges in 11 counties.

Investigators say David Berry Sr.’s other son, Eric Berry, was later caught with another person spotlighting deer, where poachers use light at night to make deer pause and easier to hunt.

The investigation into the Berrys began in late 2015, when the conservation agency received an anonymous tip about deer poaching in Lawrence County.

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Information from: Springfield News-Leader, http://www.news-leader.com

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