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Hazel doesn’t hold back against Woodall in GA7 debate

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Marines are known as fearless, and this held true as Shane Hazel, the former Force Recon Marine, took on establishment incumbent Ron Woodall in the Republican debate for the Georgia 7th Congressional District Thursday night. The two traded barbs, but while Hazel’s centered around Woodall’s repeated betrayals of his conservative constituents, all Woodall could point to was Hazel’s lack of political experience and criticism for his plans to scale back the out of control leviathan that is the US federal government. Hazel in particular noted Woodall’s most recent snub of a conservative agenda when he voted in favor of the $1.3 Trillion omnibus bill that thrilled Democrats and agitated the most fiscally conservative members of Congress such as Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), and the entire House Freedom Caucus. The omnibus bill included: $500 Million for Planned Parenthood, $30 Billion for a tunnel in New York, and continued to fund Sanctuary Cities, yet included only a pittance for the proposed border wall.

Woodall implied that Hazel only wanted to say “no” to bills instead of saying “yes,” ignoring the fact that that is precisely what conservatives want Congress to do after 8 years of the Obama Administration getting pretty much whatever it wanted to grow the size and scope of government. Further, Woodall appeared disinterested throughout the debate, or at the very best, amused, as if the debate were merely a formality and that the nomination for his reelection were a foregone conclusion. Hazel, by contrast, had the intent look of a man trying to save his children’s future, and by extension, the entire country’s future as well.

Hazel detailed his plans to me in an exclusive interview a few weeks ago, and has maintained his opposition to the GOP’s lack of fiscal discipline and its unwillingness to put a stop to the legacy policies of the previous administration such as Obamacare and a lack of border enforcement. I sat down with him for a post-debate interview.

BW: How do you feel the debate went?

SH: I’ll let the crowd be the judge. The crowd was hugely supportive post debate, hugging us and telling us how much they supported us. We’ve had a huge outpouring of support since the debate and it shows that people are ready for a change and not the establishment anymore.

BW: What do you think it says that Woodall could only point to your lack of political experience and kept attacking your ideas to scale back the size of government?

SH: I think it shows how out of touch he is. I’ve supported him every time he has voted in line with the constitution. There is no secret sauce. Simply follow your oath and I’ll support you. Rob Woodall is not doing that. His last question to me on what bills I would say “yes” to shows this clearly.

BW: For many conservatives the line between Republicans and Democrats has gotten ever more blurry. Why do you think the one gentleman in the audience reacted so strongly to your suggestion that Woodall run as a Democrat? Many conservatives wonder the same about MANY Republicans in the House and Senate.

SH: The gentleman in question is named Toddy Lentz and he is not a private citizen, but rather running for the same seat as an independent. I honestly think he was a Woodall plant. He’s a big Woodall fan and basically endorsed Woodall. He actually tried to warn me before the debate began to “be nice.” He’s a constant critic of mine, and has a web page dedicated to just bashing me. Apparently I’m living rent-free in his head.

BW: Do you feel the debate accomplished the things you wanted it to? I know from speaking to Banks Wise in a previous interview this wasn’t easy to get.

SH: Absolutely worth the effort for this sitting congressman to have to sit and try to defend his record. 

BW: Do you think Woodall voting in favor of this extraordinarily unpopular omnibus bill and then coming back here just days later for a debate shows a level of entitlement to renomination?

SH: Yes. This is what happens. They pass spending to make their lobbyist big donors happy and then come back to their district and try to make everything seem fine and dandy when people know it’s not. People are mad about this bill and I don’t think the plan is going to work this time. He doesn’t understand why Trump won, and that’s because people are frustrated with politics as usual.

You can view the entire debate from Hazel’s Facebook page here.

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Trump continues to embarrass himself with Twitter idiocy, #SmockingGun edition

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Trump continues to embarrass himself with Twitter idiocy Smocking Gun edition

Multiple writers on this site have asked, begged, and even demanded the President of the United States assign someone literate to read his Tweets before he sends them out. This time, he can’t even blame autocorrect or mistyping. He misspelled a common word. Twice.

I support the President and I think many of the complaints about his lack of intelligence are unfounded. But when it comes to posting on Twitter, I’ve lost the will to defend him. He refuses to let anyone help him not sound like a complete illiterate fool.

Does he not realize that he can’t spell? Is he unaware that his grammatical skills are lacking? Why won’t he simply write his Tweets, then hand the phone to someone who knows how to spell and utilize proper grammar before pushing the send button? His son Barron is almost certainly better at basic English than his father. He would save his supporters a lot of grief if he just let an adult read his Tweets before they went out.

Seriously, Mr. President, for the sake of those of us who still support you, do us all a favor and let the nearest adult read your Tweets before sending them out. You’re making it so much harder for us to convince others that you’re not a imbecile.

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News

Macron addresses France amid protests; is it too late?

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Macron addresses France amid protests is it too late

PARIS (AP) — French President Emmanuel Macron is at last preparing to speak to the nation Monday, after increasingly violent and radicalized protests against his leadership and a long silence that aggravated the anger. Many protesters only want one thing: for him to declare “I quit.”

That’s an unlikely prospect. Instead Macron is expected to announce a series of measures to reduce taxes and boost purchasing power for the masses who feel his presidency has favored the rich. He’s being forced to act after four weeks of “yellow vest” protests that started in struggling provinces and spread to rioting in the capital that has scared tourists and foreign investors and shaken France to the core.

Macron met Monday morning in his presidential palace with local and national politicians, unions and business leaders to hear their concerns. In the evening, he will give a national televised address, his first public words in more than a week.

The morning meeting stretched past lunch and into the afternoon. A presidential official said there were 37 people around the table with the president, describing how the movement is impacting their sectors, including unions, small businesses and local government.

Among steps the government is considering are abolishing taxes on overtime, speeding up tax cuts and an end-of-year bonus for low-income workers. Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Monday the government could delay some payroll taxes, but expressed resistance to restoring the wealth tax or lowering taxes for retirees, among protesters’ demands. He stressed that the measures should focus on helping the working classes.

“We are ready to make any gesture” that works, he said on RTL radio. “What is important now is to put an end to the crisis and find peace and unity in the country again.”

Fallout from the protests so far could cost France 0.1 percent of gross domestic product in the last quarter of the year, Le Maire warned. “That means fewer jobs, it means less prosperity for the whole country,” he said.

The “yellow vest” protests began as a movement against a rise in fuel taxes that Macron eventually abandoned, but have mushroomed to include a plethora of sometimes contradictory demands — increasingly including Macron’s resignation.

“Macron is there for the rich, not for all the French,” 68-year-old retiree Jean-Pierre Meunuer said at Saturday’s protests in Paris.

Some members of the movement are already planning new action next Saturday, amid calls from police officers exhausted by four weekends of rioting for the payment of overtime work instead of bonuses.

“The State should commit itself to the payment of overtime,” the UNSA police union said in a statement on Monday. “These extra hours should be exempted from tax. Night hours should be revalued. UNSA police officials will listen carefully to the president’s announcements.”

Graffiti throughout the French capital singles Macron out for criticism, reflecting a national sense that the 40-year-old centrist former banker is arrogant and out of touch. Macron however has appeared determined to continue his course, and no presidential or parliamentary elections are planned until 2022.

Government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux warned Sunday that a “magic wand” won’t solve all the problems of the protesters.

Paris tourist sites reopened Sunday, while workers cleaned up debris from protests that left widespread damage in the capital and elsewhere. At least 71 people were injured in Paris on Saturday, fewer than the week before but still a stunning figure. French media reported 136,000 protesters nationwide on Saturday, similar to the previous week.

Nearly 1,000 people were being held in custody after the Saturday protests in the French capital.

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Sylvie Corbet, Elaine Ganley and Samuel Petrequin contributed.

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Culture and Religion

How likely is it that a single protein can form by chance?

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How likely is it that a single protein can form by chance

To really answers the question of whether life was created or came about by random chance, we need to take a mathematical look at things. It may be easier to form our opinions based on something we read in a junior high science book, but there really is more to it than the surface questions asked and answered by scientists and theologians alike.

For the faithful, it comes down to faith. For the scientific, it also comes down to faith. Whose faith is more likely to be correct?

Part of the answer can be found in this short video. Those who think there’s no faith associated with scientific theories clearly don’t understand the mathematics behind the science they claim to hold dear.

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