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Why big corporations love Net Neutrality

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Steven Crowder is not arguing for or against Net Neutrality; however he is posing a question. Why is there selective outrage against evil corporations? Facebook, Google, and Twitter love Net Neutrality however they are all just as bad as the ISPs everyone is calling evil. In fact while Net Neutrality sets regulations for ISP’s treatment of data, these giants are free to throttle data as they see fit. I believe Steven Crowder is presenting a perspective that gets us one step closer to finding a real solution to pressing internet concerns.

People assume that critiquing Net Neutrality is inherently in favor of corporate data throttling and slower internet, but it’s not the case. Net Neutrality has its positives, but doesn’t protect the free internet like people suggest. Under Net Neutrality, the large tech giants have done more censorship and data throttling of content than any ISP ever did before. People need to hear both sides of an issue. Net Neutrality is an issue where both sides are making reasonable arguments(which is becoming rare). So actually discuss it and not panic like all these liberals are doing on Twitter.

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Social media one cause for adolescence now starting at 10 and lasting until 24

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Social media one cause for adolescence now starting at 10 and lasting until 24

A new scientific paper out of England proposes that social media is one cause for both the premature ending of childhood and delayed transition to adulthood until age 24.

The age of adolescence

www.thelancet.com/journals/lanchi/article/PIIS2352-4642(18)30022-1/fulltextAdolescence is the phase of life stretching between childhood and adulthood, and its definition has long posed a conundrum. Adolescence encompasses elements of biological growth and major social role transitions, both of which have changed in the past century. Earlier puberty has accelerated the onset of adolescence in nearly all populations, while understanding of continued growth has lifted its endpoint age well into the 20s. In parallel, delayed timing of role transitions, including completion of education, marriage, and parenthood, continue to shift popular perceptions of when adulthood begins.

The paper suggests a view of adolescence as between the ages of 10 and 24 “corresponds more closely to adolescent growth and popular understandings of this life phase.”

The paper also remarked on the role of social media, regarding it as being among the “unprecedented social forces…affecting health and wellbeing across these years.”

The paper cited “delayed timing of role transitions, including completion of education, marriage and parenthood” in affecting the perception of when adulthood effectively begins. It goes on to suggest the longer range of adolescence is “essential” for “developmentally appropriate framing of laws, social policies, and service systems.”

If the paper’s premise were adopted, one logical conclusion would be the extension of the period in life when one might enjoy the privileges of adulthood, such as voting and driving automobiles, without the corresponding responsibilities or legal liabilities of being an adult (for which those costs are often shifted to the innocent victims or society in general). For example, in many states, minors (under age 18) are treated as juveniles and often receive much more lenient sentences (and charging decisions) on account of age, even when their crime is very much a “grown-up” crime and the impact of the crime on the victim is no less.

One can also view this as cynical social engineering. A call to increase social services, with the justification of an expanded population “in need” and “at risk,” would result in subsequent calls for increased government funding of social services. As someone has to be paid to provide those services, the redefinition of adolescence can be suspected to be merely the latest pseudo-scientific attempt to lengthen the public employee / social services gravy train, which always seems to run on time.

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Science and Tech

Twitter’s ‘Big Brother’ tactics revealed as they brag about seeing nude images in private messages

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Twitters Big Brother tactics revealed as they brag about seeing nude images in private messages

We thought it was bad when Twitter employees described “shadow bans” on conservative users. It represented the type of secret censorship that keeps Americans in the dark. What we learn now from Project Veritas is that it gets much worse. It’s not just politics. It’s personal.

HIDDEN CAMERA: HUNDREDS of Twitter Employees Paid to View “Everything You Post Online” Including Private “Sex Messages”

https://www.projectveritas.com/2018/01/15/hidden-camera-hundreds-of-twitter-employees-paid-to-view-everything-you-post-online-including-private-sex-messages/(San Francisco) Project Veritas has released undercover footage of Twitter Engineers and employees admitting that Twitter employees view all of your private messages on their servers and analyze it to create a “virtual profile” of you which they sell to advertisers.

The footage features four current Twitter software engineers–Conrado Miranda, Clay Haynes, Pranay Singh, and Mihai Alexandru Florea.

Haynes, who was featured in part one of the Twitter exposé, admitted in a January 6, 2018 meeting that Twitter has hired hundreds employees with the express purpose of looking at these “d*ck pics,” stating:

Let’s be fair about this upfront. If you decide to put something online, you should expect zero privacy. It doesn’t matter how “private” something is supposed to be, including Twitter’s direct message feature. If it’s out there, someone has access to it and potentially eyeballs on it.

That’s not to excuse Twitter’s sins. This is a horrible practice for the sake of detailed big data they can use for advertisers. They are likely guilty of abusing their users’ trust just as users are guilty of being silly enough to think their online posts are truly private.

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Culture and Religion

Personalized Artificial Intelligence: Project Pai hopes to let you do things for yourself without you

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Personalized Artificial Intelligence Project Pai hopes to let you do things for yourself without you

Imagine having a digital “avatar” that could do things for you. It could interact how you interact, do things on your behalf, and possibly even replace you in certain situations. Sound impossible? It may not be for long.

Project PAI, which stands for Personalized Artificial Intelligence, hopes to build these avatars based upon your online interactions. It utilizes blockchain protocols to power the creation of a “virtual you” that you can unleash on the web and eventually through other venues.

Let’s fast-forward a bit with speculation. Could this ever be used to create an avatar that is so much like you, it replaces you completely? Could it be used to help grieving friends and family once you die? Could it sit in for you in meetings? The potential here is incredible, but it can also be scary. There was an episode of Dark Mirror that took it to the extreme, taking similar concepts and applying them to a synthetic body that replaced  a deceased husband.

Others, as you can watch in the video above, are even more skeptical about the potential this brings.

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