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Make DACA the incentive to fully, completely, and permanently secure the borders

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The popular conundrum for most conservatives addressing DACA’s eventual legislative replacement is that the 800,000 “DREAMers” can’t be “punished” for their parents’ lawlessness. Many of them are good, productive, patriotic Americans who just want to live like those of us who were either born here or came into the country legally. We can have a heart, right?

There are three problems with DACA that I detailed on Conservative Haven. Those three problems are that the original executive order was likely unconstitutional, there have been many potential legislative fixes that should have been fought for rather than dismissed with the stroke of a pen, and lawlessness was being rewarded (which means future lawlessness will be encouraged).

For these three glaring reasons, I’ve been resolute since it was initially signed in my stance that it should be rescinded and never touched again. It’s unfortunate that President Obama’s actions gave hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants hope that even he knew would eventually be taken away (remember, he said it was a temporary fix). It’s even more unfortunate that rescinding it without a legislative replacement would mean these 800,000 people would be subject to potential deportation, but if we’re to be a sovereign nation we must enforce the law of the land. That law offers legal ways for people to live and work in the country. It’s not fair to people born American citizens or those who immigrated to the country legally (of which I am one) to compete with people who, based upon the law of the land, should not be in the country in the first place.

To be clear, I have absolutely nothing against DREAMers themselves. As so many have pointed out, these are people who were children brought to the country illegally. It’s not their fault and I lay no blame on them, but they should not be rewarded because their parents broke the law. The analogy we see on social media says letting DREAMers stay would be like letting a kid keep a bicycle their parents stole for them just because they’re innocent of the crime itself. Even if they didn’t do the stealing, they still have to give the bike back.

It’s a tough situation. Nobody wants to be the bad guy (though some of us are willing to stand by the truth and the Constitution even if it makes us seem bad to some). As such, it’s pretty clear that there will be a legislative solution to allow DREAMers to stay.

I’m okay with that as long as there’s a very clear trade-off. Allowing them to stay will have consequences. As Streiff over at RedState pointed out, “The solution looks easy: give 800,000 illegals a clear path to citizenship. But what about the next 800,000 that will follow?” To mitigate the damage of allowing DREAMers to stay, the GOP absolutely must leverage the replacement legislation with unambiguous solutions to the rest of our illegal immigration problems.

Before we get to some of the potential solutions, I want to note something about President Trump. I’ve been mixed on his approach to DACA. First, I applauded him, declaring Trump to end DACA the right way for the right reasons. Then, I felt like I’d just been punked when he Tweeted his willingness to “revisit” DACA if Congress failed.

Now, I’m starting to wonder if this is all part of the plan. I seriously doubt it, but I’m holding onto hope that he and GOP leadership are coming at this with a parley in mind. Based upon the GOP’s track record and Trump’s strange Tweet, I’m skeptical. I’m not alone:

With all that said, here are the things that need to be attached to a bipartisan DACA replacement bill:

Criminals get deported. Period.

I don’t care how many dreams a DREAMer has. If he or she has committed a felony, they’re out. I’m not talking about parking tickets, but I’m also not talking about just the violent criminals. This must be viewed as an unearned privilege which means they need to be exemplary legal non-citizens if that’s to be their designation.

Build the wall.

This should be a nobrainer. In a perfect world the “wall” would be a technological security apparatus rather than a physical wall. By using drones, sensors, and detectors, a virtual wall would be more effective, less expensive to build and maintain, and wouldn’t require the obtuse use of eminent domain. Sadly, the wall that President Trump has in mind is as much a permanent monument for his legacy as it is a security measure, so it’ll be an actual wall. Fine. Let’s build it.

Ongoing applications, productivity criteria, and an end goal of proper legal immigration.

Amnesty and pathway to citizenship should be taken off the table, at least in their traditional forms. DREAMers as well as those here on work visas should be allowed to stay but must continue to reapply periodically with job and housing status included. If their intention is to stay indefinitely, they must go through the same process as someone applying to live and work here coming legally from another country. Just because they were brought here illegally doesn’t mean they get special treatment.

No “chain migration” allowed.

The argument that DREAMers are the only beneficiaries of their status must be put to practice. If they choose to stay in this country, they cannot then turn around and bring their family (some of whom broke the law to get them here in the first place) with them. Sounds harsh, right? The phrase “chain migration” is often associated with white supremacists but it’s a real problem despite the association. We have to address this issue or the argument used by defenders of DACA suddenly loses its basis in reality.

Sudden cutoff.

One of the biggest problems with DACA is that it encourages people to make the arduous journey across the border in hopes their children can stay. After President Obama signed it, we saw a spike in crossings, particularly from families. This will repeat itself if there’s a window of opportunity. We need that window to close suddenly. No warning. The legislation should include an immediate point in time in which potential DREAMers must make themselves known. Once the date passes, the window of opportunity is shut. No need to encourage a blitz on the border.

No DREAMers in sanctuary cities.

As a Federalist, I do not like the federal government strong-arming cities or states. As a staunch opponent of sanctuary cities, I would love any lawful incentive to make them change their minds. Part of the DACA replacement should include a controversial component: no DREAMer status will be allowed to those living in sanctuary cities. The logic is a stretch but it works: In order to coordinate the proper monitoring and enforcement of DREAMers’ ongoing status, a city must be willing to work with those who enforce the law at the national level.

If Trump is truly the master of the deal and if the GOP is serious about getting something done on immigration and border security, they’ll figure out a way to make this palatable to the Democrats. If all they can muster is a legislative DACA replacement without attaching lawful components to help solve bigger problems, what we’ll see in the coming months is another Republican retreat. They have the leverage. It’s time for them to figure out how to use it.

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Guns and Crime

After 57 years, George Carroll’s remains have been found

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After 57 years, George Carroll's remains have been found

In 1961, George Carroll went missing on Long Island, New York. His remains were found buried beneath the basement of his home and is now at the center of a 57-year-old murder investigation.

The remains were found by Carroll’s son, Michael Carroll, who was an infant when his father disappeared. He was excavating the basement of the Lake Grove home on October 31 with his sons when the remains were found.

Police are treating it as a homicide.

The wife of the victim, Dorothy Carroll, died more than two decades ago. There were rumors among family members that the victim was buried under the house, but nobody looked there until this year, according to the son.

“It’s something that’s been talked about for years,” he said. “We heard multiple stories.”

This case will test the lengths in which modern forensic science can be used to solve old crimes. As cold cases go, a 57-year-old murder may be too cold to solve.

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Science and Tech

As car technology advances, every dealership needs a NERD team like Bob Johnson Chevrolet

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As car technology advances, every dealership needs a NERD team like Bob Johnson Chevrolet

For the second time in the last two weeks, I’ve had to refer to the internet for information about how to use technology on my new Chevrolet Equinox. It’s my first new car in nearly a decade and the advancements are incredible, but there’s something lacking. Nobody showed me how to use the teen driver system and I couldn’t get my phone connected. I understand many people already understand how to use such technologies, but I’m not embarrassed to admit I’m not one of them.

The internet showed me I wasn’t alone, but it brought up the question of why I wasn’t shown this at the dealership the first time? How was I allowed to drive off with my major expenditure without being shown exactly how all these cool features work? So, I turned to the internet to complain but found out not all dealerships are like this.

Apparently, Bob Johnson Chevrolet in Rochester, NY, does exactly what I hoped someone did with me. They actually show all of their new vehicle buyers how their new vehicles work.

“Our mission is to help our customers learn how to use the technology in their vehicles so they get the most from it,” said Dylan Love, NERD station manager.

Their team of five works with customers to give them as much technical information as they need. Some can get in and out quickly because they are already familiar with the technology. Others, like me, would need a lot more assistance and this NERD team would have given it to me if I had bought my vehicle there.

Never assume knowledge

My aforementioned daughter has a knack for technology, but she grew up in a different time. She was immersed in technology before she could ride a bike. My youngest are already so adept at using their various devices that I often turn to them for assistance on my iPad. But automotive technology is different. It may be intuitive for some to connect a device that will play on the vehicle’s speakers, but there are many of us who are “old school” and still want to be shown how to do things by an actual human being.

YouTube videos are fine, but it’s not the same.

Businesses need to understand that there are still millions of Americans who are not tech savvy. It may be hard to believe since we all play around all day on our smart phones and tablets, but that’s pretty much the extent of my modern technological know-how. This is why Bob Johnson Chevrolet’s team makes so much sense to me.

It should make sense to anyone who has ever run into technological roadblocks.

The sad part is that it would be so easy. Perhaps it hearkens to a time past when customer service was as important as low prices. Making certain customers completely understand what they’re buying and how to operate it may be a notion that’s old school like me, but it shouldn’t be. It should be standard operating procedure across the board.

Advancements aren’t going to slow down any time soon. The quest to make things easier leads to knowledge gaps that must be overcome. The NERD team at Bob Johnson Chevrolet is an example that every dealership (and most businesses) should follow.

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Videos

President Trump defends himself on Fox News

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President Trump defends himself on Fox News

With so much controversy following the sentencing of Michael Cohen and a plea deal cut with the National Enquirer, President Trump went on with Fox News to defend himself. In the interview with Harris Faulkner, the President went into his history with Michael Cohen, pointed out the Congressional “slush fund” that nobody says violates campaign finance laws, and claimed he isn’t even sure if the campaign ever paid “that tabloid,” referring to the National Enquirer.

Not bad for an interview with a many who’s supposedly about to be indicted, impeached, or both.

As he is wont to do, the President swung at his detractors. He referenced other similar incidences that didn’t yield the same type of attention that he’s getting and claims that this isn’t about the alleged crimes as much as it’s about going after him personally.

Trump, in Fox News interview, says he never ‘directed’ Michael Cohen ‘to do anything wrong’

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/trump-in-fox-news-interview-says-he-never-directed-michael-cohen-to-do-anything-wrongProsecutors echoed Cohen’s claim that Trump orchestrated payments to former Playboy model Karen McDougal and adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

But Trump insisted in Thursday’s interview that the Cohen payments were “not a campaign finance violation.” He has previously tweeted that they were a “simple private transaction.”

“What he did was all unrelated to me except for the two campaign finance charges that are not criminal and shouldn’t have been on there,” Trump said of Cohen and the campaign-finance charges. “They put that on to embarrass me.”

While some are saying the President is in real trouble from two investigative bodies and the upcoming Democratic Congress gunning for him, he seems more annoyed than concerned. Will this blow over like everything else that goes against him? Probably.

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