Connect with us

Everything

Get your compassion out of politics and start helping people

Published

on

The media are acting like overturning DACA is an affront to small children, or even those who came to the US as small children, which is not necessarily true.

I don’t give money to panhandlers, for several reasons. Number one, I grew up with a retired cop and private detective for a father who knew firsthand that many supposedly destitute beggars made more money than he did.

My dad has a famous family story about being approached by a panhandler who, after my father insisted he empty his pockets first, turned out to have an enormous wad of cash and stormed off grumbling. And concerning those beggars who might actually be in need, my dad told me more than once, “There are plenty of places that people in that situation can go to for help — I donate to some and pay taxes for more.”

I once gave money to a woman after buying into a sob story that a few weeks later proved to be entirely false. I’ve given food to people who claimed to be starving, only to be treated with contempt and anger for not giving them the money they’d asked for. And as a missionary in South America, I accompanied a homeless man to a little market to buy him bread, and as I was leaving, I saw him return the bread and buy alcohol with the money.

I’ve learned that giving to panhandlers might not be the best way to meet the financial needs of the less fortunate, so I donate regularly (as Republicans tend to do) to organizations I trust to allocate relief funds more wisely than I can.

On the flip side, I know others who, despite having similar knowledge and experiences as mine, continue to give alms to beggars, reasoning that even if they’re only truly helping one person in need for every nine frauds, it will be worth it. I deeply admire this generosity, although I think there are better ways to manifest it.

But here’s the question: which of us — those who give to panhandlers and those who donate to relief groups — is more charitable? Which of us is more compassionate to the plight of those in need?

If you’re a somewhat rational person, I’m sure you can see that while the methods might not be identical, there’s no difference in the heartfelt intent of each group: give aid to the poor and needy as best as you know how. Show love, kindness, and service toward your fellow man. Different route, same destination. One might be more effective than another, but that doesn’t mean that one is less compassionate.

Unfortunately, vocal members of the Left don’t seem to accept this duality of pure intent, instead painting anyone who disagrees with them as an evil racist bigot homophobe who wants people to die. If you don’t support “common sense” gun reform, then you don’t love the Sandy Hook victims enough. If you’re concerned with threats facing Europe and want increased vetting for refugees, you just want starving orphan children to suffer. And now, if you wear the wrong shoes to board a plane, you don’t really care about the people of Houston.

This is nonsense, and I want to believe that most people recognize it as such. But I can’t blame you if this is what you’ve come to believe if you listen to the beloved Leftist media.

We need to remember that people on both sides don’t see themselves as the bad guys; they want to be charitable and compassionate. They just want to do the right thing the right way, and they disagree on what that is.

One perfect example is the breaking news that Trump might now put an end to Obama’s DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — order after hinting a few months ago that young immigrants “shouldn’t be very worried” about the program’s future. Trump alluded to DACA’s safety and added, “I do have a big heart.”

But that’s the problem: DACA and illegal immigration in general are not about compassion or the size of your heart. Emotion sells, but it clouds our ability to make sound judgment.

However, if the Left continues to push issues based on compassion, they have to realize that it goes both ways.

There’s nothing compassionate about dismissing the millions of legal immigrants who have respect for our laws and went through the laborious process of gaining citizenship the right way. There’s nothing compassionate about taking their jobs and their benefits or making them feel second class for obeying our nation’s laws.

There’s nothing compassionate about encouraging lawlessness. There’s nothing compassionate about risking American well-being.

The media are acting like overturning DACA is an affront to small children, or even those who came to the US as small children, which is not necessarily true. This bill includes those who arrived as high school students who are now in their late 30’s, and most importantly, it doesn’t mean all illegals will be deported — just that authorities can deport if they feel that they must. There’s nothing compassionate about lying to your audience and striking unfounded fear in their hearts.

Overall, everyone wants to be empathetic toward those who simply want a better life for their family. We want to show love to our neighbor. But just because someone may disagree with you on how to accomplish those things, that doesn’t make them heartless.

The same goes for any issue. There’s nothing compassionate about destroying liberty, restricting free speech, threatening religious exercise, killing babies, stealing other people’s money, or, as Matt Walsh so aptly points out, promoting behavior that will incur God’s wrath. But I don’t want our politics to automatically jump there with every disagreement because there’s nothing productive about framing everything in terms of compassion.

We all want a better, cleaner, safer, happier, and kinder world. Compassion is a motive, not a method. And when making policy that affects everyone, you have to think from your head and not just your heart, or you’ll end up hurting one group at the expense of another. Framing every position as one of empathy does more harm than good. If you really want to help people, then stop demagoguing the issues and start creating solutions.

Get your compassion out of politics and start helping people.

Richie Angel is a Co-Editor in Chief of The New Guards. Follow him and The New Guards on Twitter, and check out The New Guards on Facebook.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Guns and Crime

After 57 years, George Carroll’s remains have been found

Published

on

After 57 years, George Carroll's remains have been found

In 1961, George Carroll went missing on Long Island, New York. His remains were found buried beneath the basement of his home and is now at the center of a 57-year-old murder investigation.

The remains were found by Carroll’s son, Michael Carroll, who was an infant when his father disappeared. He was excavating the basement of the Lake Grove home on October 31 with his sons when the remains were found.

Police are treating it as a homicide.

The wife of the victim, Dorothy Carroll, died more than two decades ago. There were rumors among family members that the victim was buried under the house, but nobody looked there until this year, according to the son.

“It’s something that’s been talked about for years,” he said. “We heard multiple stories.”

This case will test the lengths in which modern forensic science can be used to solve old crimes. As cold cases go, a 57-year-old murder may be too cold to solve.

Continue Reading

Science and Tech

As car technology advances, every dealership needs a NERD team like Bob Johnson Chevrolet

Published

on

As car technology advances, every dealership needs a NERD team like Bob Johnson Chevrolet

For the second time in the last two weeks, I’ve had to refer to the internet for information about how to use technology on my new Chevrolet Equinox. It’s my first new car in nearly a decade and the advancements are incredible, but there’s something lacking. Nobody showed me how to use the teen driver system and I couldn’t get my phone connected. I understand many people already understand how to use such technologies, but I’m not embarrassed to admit I’m not one of them.

The internet showed me I wasn’t alone, but it brought up the question of why I wasn’t shown this at the dealership the first time? How was I allowed to drive off with my major expenditure without being shown exactly how all these cool features work? So, I turned to the internet to complain but found out not all dealerships are like this.

Apparently, Bob Johnson Chevrolet in Rochester, NY, does exactly what I hoped someone did with me. They actually show all of their new vehicle buyers how their new vehicles work.

“Our mission is to help our customers learn how to use the technology in their vehicles so they get the most from it,” said Dylan Love, NERD station manager.

Their team of five works with customers to give them as much technical information as they need. Some can get in and out quickly because they are already familiar with the technology. Others, like me, would need a lot more assistance and this NERD team would have given it to me if I had bought my vehicle there.

Never assume knowledge

My aforementioned daughter has a knack for technology, but she grew up in a different time. She was immersed in technology before she could ride a bike. My youngest are already so adept at using their various devices that I often turn to them for assistance on my iPad. But automotive technology is different. It may be intuitive for some to connect a device that will play on the vehicle’s speakers, but there are many of us who are “old school” and still want to be shown how to do things by an actual human being.

YouTube videos are fine, but it’s not the same.

Businesses need to understand that there are still millions of Americans who are not tech savvy. It may be hard to believe since we all play around all day on our smart phones and tablets, but that’s pretty much the extent of my modern technological know-how. This is why Bob Johnson Chevrolet’s team makes so much sense to me.

It should make sense to anyone who has ever run into technological roadblocks.

The sad part is that it would be so easy. Perhaps it hearkens to a time past when customer service was as important as low prices. Making certain customers completely understand what they’re buying and how to operate it may be a notion that’s old school like me, but it shouldn’t be. It should be standard operating procedure across the board.

Advancements aren’t going to slow down any time soon. The quest to make things easier leads to knowledge gaps that must be overcome. The NERD team at Bob Johnson Chevrolet is an example that every dealership (and most businesses) should follow.

Continue Reading

Videos

President Trump defends himself on Fox News

Published

on

President Trump defends himself on Fox News

With so much controversy following the sentencing of Michael Cohen and a plea deal cut with the National Enquirer, President Trump went on with Fox News to defend himself. In the interview with Harris Faulkner, the President went into his history with Michael Cohen, pointed out the Congressional “slush fund” that nobody says violates campaign finance laws, and claimed he isn’t even sure if the campaign ever paid “that tabloid,” referring to the National Enquirer.

Not bad for an interview with a many who’s supposedly about to be indicted, impeached, or both.

As he is wont to do, the President swung at his detractors. He referenced other similar incidences that didn’t yield the same type of attention that he’s getting and claims that this isn’t about the alleged crimes as much as it’s about going after him personally.

Trump, in Fox News interview, says he never ‘directed’ Michael Cohen ‘to do anything wrong’

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/trump-in-fox-news-interview-says-he-never-directed-michael-cohen-to-do-anything-wrongProsecutors echoed Cohen’s claim that Trump orchestrated payments to former Playboy model Karen McDougal and adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

But Trump insisted in Thursday’s interview that the Cohen payments were “not a campaign finance violation.” He has previously tweeted that they were a “simple private transaction.”

“What he did was all unrelated to me except for the two campaign finance charges that are not criminal and shouldn’t have been on there,” Trump said of Cohen and the campaign-finance charges. “They put that on to embarrass me.”

While some are saying the President is in real trouble from two investigative bodies and the upcoming Democratic Congress gunning for him, he seems more annoyed than concerned. Will this blow over like everything else that goes against him? Probably.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Twitter

Trending

Copyright © 2018 NOQ Report