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WATCH: Jesse Watters fell for shark hoax pic in Houston floods

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Jesse Watters of Fox News’ “Watters’ World” is normally the one behind pranks, not the one falling for them.

But here Watters fell for one of the oldest fake photos that’s been swimming around Twitter for years: The shark on the flooded highway.

Watters casually references this as real. ” I’ve seen some amazing things out there just looking at television. Alligators on people’s back door steps. I saw a shark on a highway swimming in the water. Like Sharknado!”

Yeah….no. The photo, it turns out, was first published 2005 and shot in South Africa. It’s been knocking around the Internet since at least 2011.

Watch:

Twitter users raked Watters over the coals for what social media frenzies around like…sharks in the water: gullibility.

Now, all that being said…there are fake photos, but there are also real risks.

Sea creatures and swamp reptiles like alligators do get washed into human-occupied space during floods and hurricanes. In the 1994 central Georgia floods, there were gators and snakes in the hallways of flight line buildings at Robins AFB.

So…if you’re in Houston, be careful out there. You could run into some real animals, but it’s really (really) unlikely you’ll see a shark. If you’re Jesse Watters or anyone else plying the infested waters of the Internet, just be careful, period.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Jeffrey Smith

    August 29, 2017 at 5:08 am

    Watters is good at his humorous interview segments, but is in over his head trying to be a newsman.

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Guns and Crime

After 57 years, George Carroll’s remains have been found

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After 57 years, George Carroll's remains have been found

In 1961, George Carroll went missing on Long Island, New York. His remains were found buried beneath the basement of his home and is now at the center of a 57-year-old murder investigation.

The remains were found by Carroll’s son, Michael Carroll, who was an infant when his father disappeared. He was excavating the basement of the Lake Grove home on October 31 with his sons when the remains were found.

Police are treating it as a homicide.

The wife of the victim, Dorothy Carroll, died more than two decades ago. There were rumors among family members that the victim was buried under the house, but nobody looked there until this year, according to the son.

“It’s something that’s been talked about for years,” he said. “We heard multiple stories.”

This case will test the lengths in which modern forensic science can be used to solve old crimes. As cold cases go, a 57-year-old murder may be too cold to solve.

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Science and Tech

As car technology advances, every dealership needs a NERD team like Bob Johnson Chevrolet

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As car technology advances, every dealership needs a NERD team like Bob Johnson Chevrolet

For the second time in the last two weeks, I’ve had to refer to the internet for information about how to use technology on my new Chevrolet Equinox. It’s my first new car in nearly a decade and the advancements are incredible, but there’s something lacking. Nobody showed me how to use the teen driver system and I couldn’t get my phone connected. I understand many people already understand how to use such technologies, but I’m not embarrassed to admit I’m not one of them.

The internet showed me I wasn’t alone, but it brought up the question of why I wasn’t shown this at the dealership the first time? How was I allowed to drive off with my major expenditure without being shown exactly how all these cool features work? So, I turned to the internet to complain but found out not all dealerships are like this.

Apparently, Bob Johnson Chevrolet in Rochester, NY, does exactly what I hoped someone did with me. They actually show all of their new vehicle buyers how their new vehicles work.

“Our mission is to help our customers learn how to use the technology in their vehicles so they get the most from it,” said Dylan Love, NERD station manager.

Their team of five works with customers to give them as much technical information as they need. Some can get in and out quickly because they are already familiar with the technology. Others, like me, would need a lot more assistance and this NERD team would have given it to me if I had bought my vehicle there.

Never assume knowledge

My aforementioned daughter has a knack for technology, but she grew up in a different time. She was immersed in technology before she could ride a bike. My youngest are already so adept at using their various devices that I often turn to them for assistance on my iPad. But automotive technology is different. It may be intuitive for some to connect a device that will play on the vehicle’s speakers, but there are many of us who are “old school” and still want to be shown how to do things by an actual human being.

YouTube videos are fine, but it’s not the same.

Businesses need to understand that there are still millions of Americans who are not tech savvy. It may be hard to believe since we all play around all day on our smart phones and tablets, but that’s pretty much the extent of my modern technological know-how. This is why Bob Johnson Chevrolet’s team makes so much sense to me.

It should make sense to anyone who has ever run into technological roadblocks.

The sad part is that it would be so easy. Perhaps it hearkens to a time past when customer service was as important as low prices. Making certain customers completely understand what they’re buying and how to operate it may be a notion that’s old school like me, but it shouldn’t be. It should be standard operating procedure across the board.

Advancements aren’t going to slow down any time soon. The quest to make things easier leads to knowledge gaps that must be overcome. The NERD team at Bob Johnson Chevrolet is an example that every dealership (and most businesses) should follow.

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Videos

President Trump defends himself on Fox News

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President Trump defends himself on Fox News

With so much controversy following the sentencing of Michael Cohen and a plea deal cut with the National Enquirer, President Trump went on with Fox News to defend himself. In the interview with Harris Faulkner, the President went into his history with Michael Cohen, pointed out the Congressional “slush fund” that nobody says violates campaign finance laws, and claimed he isn’t even sure if the campaign ever paid “that tabloid,” referring to the National Enquirer.

Not bad for an interview with a many who’s supposedly about to be indicted, impeached, or both.

As he is wont to do, the President swung at his detractors. He referenced other similar incidences that didn’t yield the same type of attention that he’s getting and claims that this isn’t about the alleged crimes as much as it’s about going after him personally.

Trump, in Fox News interview, says he never ‘directed’ Michael Cohen ‘to do anything wrong’

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/trump-in-fox-news-interview-says-he-never-directed-michael-cohen-to-do-anything-wrongProsecutors echoed Cohen’s claim that Trump orchestrated payments to former Playboy model Karen McDougal and adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

But Trump insisted in Thursday’s interview that the Cohen payments were “not a campaign finance violation.” He has previously tweeted that they were a “simple private transaction.”

“What he did was all unrelated to me except for the two campaign finance charges that are not criminal and shouldn’t have been on there,” Trump said of Cohen and the campaign-finance charges. “They put that on to embarrass me.”

While some are saying the President is in real trouble from two investigative bodies and the upcoming Democratic Congress gunning for him, he seems more annoyed than concerned. Will this blow over like everything else that goes against him? Probably.

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