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Will Trump’s presidency survive?

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So far, President Trump has gone through a Chief of Staff, Press Secretary, two Communications Directors (Spicer counts, along with Scaramucci’s disastrous 11 days), a National Security Adviser, an FBI Director, nearly an Attorney General (the jury is still out), a Homeland Security Director (he tapped the serving one to be the new CoS) and a Chief Strategist. He’s been in office just over 200 days.

This pace of turnover is completely unsustainable.

No large organization could long survive this kind of turmoil, and the United States requires, above all, stability. Free countries look to America for stability in a world filled with Venezuelas, Syrias and Brexits. America under Trump is not stable.

Trump’s presidency is based on about 25 percent of Americans who love him no matter what he does. It’s based on constant entertainment, lots of light with no heat–or heat without light depending on how you look at things. A Republican Congress, under Trump, has been able to do nearly nothing besides appoint a new Supreme Court Justice. Great: Neil Gorsuch is wonderful, but not enough.

Rex Tillerson, James Mattis and Vice President Mike Pence have spent the last six months traveling the world (but not at the same time–someone has to mind the Romper Room Oval Office) cleaning up Trump’s Twitter-diarrheic messes. Tillerson has unfilled posts at the State Department that Steve Bannon blocked because he the candidates didn’t pass his dogmatic filter.

Now Bannon is gone, along with Reince Priebus and Sean Spicer. The White House is run by Trump, his family and a couple of four-star generals. I trust the generals–mostly.

Either some discipline will be instilled, or Trump’s presidency is in danger. It’s not necessarily in danger from impeachment, because they’d have to find something impeachable. Congress does have the Constitutional authority to impeach for whatever reason it wants, but it doesn’t have the political backing to do it.

I haven’t looked at numbers, but I’d be willing to bet that the polarized elements of the American polity were just as polarized under Presidents Obama and Bush 43 as they are now. I’d bet that about 25 percent of Americans would have supported Barack Obama if he had murdered someone in the street, and another 25 percent opposed him no matter what he did. With the exception of a six month period after 9/11, I think the same thing about George W. Bush.

But Trump has made the polarization so much worse. Were Congress to attempt to impeach him, I believe violence would erupt.

So where does that leave us?

The over/under

Some of the writers here and myself have had a discussion of where things might go from here. Jesse Broadt has written her own piece calling for Trump’s removal under the 25th Amendment, section 4. That’s certainly a possibility, but again, it takes 2/3 of Congress to ratify.

Here’s our take.

Paige Rogers:

I walked out of the voting booth and, as I was walking to my car I kept thinking, “This is the 1st time I’ve voted and not been excited about it.”

I think America would end up in a civil war if Trump were to be removed, and maybe even if he we’re to resign on his own accord. Regular people became so disenchanted [and unfortunately, were sometimes disenfranchised] by the time Obama’s 2nd term ended. A vote is a vote and I think it should stand, bc I’d like for our Democratic process to remain intact. I am praying for our country and all our leaders!

Eric Dixon:

Trump is a stubborn and iconoclastic man who will be determined to prove his detractors wrong. He is capable of having (and likely to have) isolated but significant successes. 

In fact, Trump’s presidential political trajectory (if not his philosophy or temperament) can follow Ronald Reagan’s. Reagan’s approval ratings dove early in his first term as the economy fell back into recession in 1982-83, and his re-election was in great doubt going into the summer of 1984. Likewise, if Trump gets his troubles “out of the way” early in his first term, he has plenty of room — and plenty of time — to recover to a point where he can rehabilitate his presidency and his re-election prospects. I think he will serve a full term. 

A full second term. 

Dan Alexander:

I think he will serve the full first term, unfortunately. Then, sensing his own demise in the 2020 campaign, he will not seek re-election. I think he would rather step down than suffer a loss. 

Jeremy Frankel:

To be honest at that point I was sort of warmed up to Trump and was very happy about my vote because how scared I was of Hillary. I don’t regret my vote but I was pretty upset that he was the best choice there.

I do still reiterate that it seems that the one thing people fear more than Trump is the Left and the media (Hence many conservative voters). Which is why his base hasn’t shrunk much at all, throughout all the chaos.

Me:

I don’t think Trump can change. I don’t think the country can suffer him for 3 1/2 more years. The immovable object will continue to resist the unstoppable force.

I believe Trump will realize that the government cannot work with him as its leader. Congress will cease to function as a lawmaking body. The executive branch will cease to function in any capacity other than a administrative factotum.

Other nations will take advantage of American instability. We may find ourselves in an unintentional, limited but intense war. We might find ourselves withdrawing like cowards in the face of much weaker nations.

In the end, I believe Trump will resign, simply because being president will not be an enjoyable or uplifting experience any longer. The rallies will cease to be a salve for his ego. He will be alone, isolated, and unable to focus on anything but his many enemies.

He never wanted to win anyway.

Some closing thoughts

Eric Dixon supplied some happy thoughts for the weekend at the close of what’s been a terrible, awful, tumultuous week full of death and uncertainty. We could use some sunshine.

I don’t think the nation is past a tipping point.

Why? Consider what the vast majority of Americans, of all backgrounds, are doing this weekend.

They’re not thinking about Charlottesville, statues of dead men or Steve Bannon.

They’re thinking about vacations, going to the beach, a NASCAR race or the upcoming football season.

Plenty of young people are thinking about…how can I say this delicately?…reproduction. 

The supermarkets are full, gasoline is half the price it was in 2008, electricity is plentiful (and often cheaper than it used to be), the Internet is running, half the country has smartphones.

Trump could resign tonight, and none of the above will change. 

These are all signs of a confident, content — if somewhat under-informed — people, aren’t they?

Managing Editor of NOQ Report. Serial entrepreneur. Faith, family, federal republic. One nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

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Culture and Religion

21-year-old with Down Syndrome speaks out to the United Nations

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21-year-old with Down Syndrome speaks out to the United Nations

Charlotte Helene Fien loves golf. She’s been golfing since she was 6-years-old and would love a job with which she can teach children how to play. Just like so many young adults venturing forth into the world, she has ambitions, dreams, and goals. Some people don’t think she should have had the opportunity to pursue those things. Fein has Down Syndrome.

In response to a Tunisian attorney’s comments during a United Nations Human Rights Committee meeting, Fein has made a video. The lawyer reportedly claimed that abortion is a viable means to prevent a life-long “handicap” like Down Syndrome. As with most “tolerant” leftist arguments on the topic, he felt his superior sense of humanity dictated he needed to do whatever he could to prevent people like Fein from every leaving the womb and becoming part of his world.

Watch the video and share it with anyone who needs to be reminded that people are people regardless of how the United Nations wishes to classify their existence.

Source: Faithwire

‘I’m a Human Being Just Like You’: 21-Year-Old Woman With Down Syndrome Delivers Powerful Rebuke to the UN

http://www.faithwire.com/2017/11/24/im-a-human-being-just-like-you-21-year-old-woman-with-down-syndrome-delivers-powerful-rebuke-to-the-un/Fien responded with a powerful open letter hitting back at these statements and at people who believe that those like her should be “aborted up to birth.” In addition to proclaiming that she is “deeply offended” and feels attacked for who she is, she affirmed her humanity and asked that the attorney think deeper about his proclamations.

“I’m a human being just like you. Our only difference is an extra chromosome,” she wrote. “My extra chromosome makes me far more tolerant than you, sir.”

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Guns and Crime

Did Joe Arpaio target Jeff Flake’s son with animal cruelty charges?

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Did Joe Arpaio target Jeff Flakes son with animal cruelty charges

Joe Arpaio doesn’t shy away from controversy and isn’t averse to causing a little mayhem. The latest incident may be even bigger than just whether or not he did wrong as he’s considering running for a Senate seat. The source of his troubles: the son of the man he may hope to replace, Senator Jeff Flake.

In 2014, Arpaio’s Sheriff’s Department looked into Austin Flake’s and his wife’s involvement in the deaths of 21 dogs. It was in a kennel operated by his in-laws. The Flakes were watching the dogs while the proprietors of the kennel were out of town.

Their deaths were due to an air conditioning unit that failed in a small room where the dogs spent the nights. Based on this information, the case against the Flakes was dismissed.

The lawsuit they’ve filed against Arpaio says they were targeted for political reasons to embarrass the Senator. They were put under surveillance and every effort was made to prove they were to blame for the deaths. The lawsuit goes to trial December 5.

Further Reading

Joe Arpaio accused of charging Jeff Flake’s son with animal cruelty to embarrass Arizona senator

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/joe-arpaio-accused-of-charging-jeff-flakes-son-with-animal-cruelty-to-embarrass-arizona-senator/article/2641649Sen. Jeff Flake was a vocal opponent of Arpaio’s handling of immigration issues in Maricopa County, the couple’s legal team said.

Arpaio and Jeffrey Leonard, an attorney representing the county and the former sheriff, declined to comment to the AP on the matter.

The couple previously sought $4 million in a notice of claim document for the suit, according to the AP.

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Foreign Affairs

Saudi Crown Prince calls Iran’s leader “The new Hitler of the Middle East”

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By: Terresa Monroe-Hamilton

 

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, 32, who is also their defense minister, dramatically escalated war tensions with Iran this last week in an interview with the New York Times. He called the Supreme Leader of Iran “the new Hitler of the Middle East.” The two countries have been edging towards military confrontation with an Iranian jet from Yemen attempting to bomb Saudi Arabia. It was shot down, but the tensions escalated precipitously afterward. It’s no secret that Saudi Arabia which is Sunni Muslim and the Shi’ite Muslims of Iran are bitter rivals militarily and politically.

The Prince is now suggesting that Iran’s alleged expansion under Ayatollah Ali Khamenei needs to be confronted and dealt with once and for all. He told the New York Times, “But we learned from Europe that appeasement doesn’t work. We don’t want the new Hitler in Iran to repeat what happened in Europe in the Middle East.” Iran slapped back immediately at the Prince, saying that he was discredited internationally by his “immature” behavior. “No one in the world and in the international arena gives credit to him because of his immature and weak-minded behavior and remarks,” Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qasemi was quoted as saying.

Qasemi followed up that insult with a threat, “I strongly advise him to think and ponder upon the fate of the famous dictators of the region in the past few years now that he is thinking of considering their policies and behavior as a role model.” And the dance to war continues. Tensions rocketed earlier this month when Lebanon’s Saudi-allied Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned in a television broadcast from Riyadh, citing the influence of Iran-backed Hezbollah in Lebanon and risks to his life. Hezbollah retaliated by calling the move an act of war that was orchestrated by the Saudis. The Saudis denied it. Hariri has since returned to Lebanon and suspended his resignation.

Amid a consolidation of power in Saudi Arabia, with a so-called crackdown on corruption, a purge of the Royal Family and Salman’s ascension to the throne, war is looming with Iran. The prince, who is expected to succeed his father, King Salman bin Abdulaziz, 81, compared Iran and Saudi Arabia’s power struggle in the region to those fighting for Europe in World War II. The Saudis have launched thousands of air strikes in a 2 1/2-year-old war in neighboring Yemen to defeat the Iranian-aligned Houthi movement that seized broad swaths of the country. Everyone knows the Iranians are behind it and are using the Houthis as a proxy in the war. Salman claims that Saudi Arabia is winning the war and 85 percent of Yemen’s territory is now controlled by their allies.

While this may or may not be the case, the Houthis control the major population centers in the country still. The Saudi-led military coalition waging war on them is receiving intelligence and refueling for its warplanes by the United States. Over 10,000 people have died in the fighting to date. The group launched a ballistic missile toward Riyadh’s main airport on Nov. 4th, which Saudi Arabia decried as an act of war by Tehran. Salman proclaimed in May that the kingdom would ensure that future struggles would be waged in Iran.

For his part, Khamenei has referred to the House of Saud as an “accursed tree, ” and Iranian officials have accused the kingdom of spreading terrorism, an accusation it denies. For the record, Iran is the largest sponsor of terror on the planet, but Saudi Arabia is guilty of terrorism as well. Iran is working with Russia to take over Syria. They also basically control Iraq. A stepped-up war involving Saudi Arabia would no doubt draw in the United States on the side of Saudi Arabia and Russia and China on the side of Iran. China is offering to help rebuild Syria. If you were looking for Armageddon, this would suffice nicely.

The New York Times refers to this as the Saudi Arabian Arab Spring. This one is led from the top down and is militarily explosive. It is also a cultural revolution and a reformation of Islam. The Crown Prince stated to the New York Times: “Do not write that we are ‘reinterpreting’ Islam—we are ‘restoring’ Islam to its origins—and our biggest tools are the Prophet’s practices and (daily life in—ed) Saudi Arabia before 1979.” Bin Salman stressed that in the time of the Prophet Muhammad, there were theaters, Jews and Christians in Saudi Arabia and that the country’s first judge was a woman. “So the Prophet was not a Muslim?” asked bin Salman, rhetorically. World War III or reformation… it will be a conflict that eventually involves all major powers in a geopolitical conflict.

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