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Imran Awan: Why conservatives shouldn’t root for a Wasserman-Schultz prosecution

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The developing case of Congresswoman Deborah Wasserman-Schultz’s information technology officer, Imran Awan, presents the newest moral conflict.

For conservatives!

Let’s analyze what many on our side (or any side in politics) are searching for. On one hand, we see the bloodlust for our “opponents” to fall, and even, to be injured. What’s sometimes expressed by rabid activists is the conclusion that the opponent (today, it’s DWS) is a crook, a criminal, an actual felon in waiting, and thus deserves whatever opprobrium we can muster.

There is a strategic and rational, and too-often-unspoken object (and desire), basis supporting these sentiments. The goal is to see the political opposition weakened in effectiveness. Discrediting them — at least among the sliver of the increasingly apathetic electorate which theoretically might have an open mind — in order to win over undecideds or even “flip” leaners, is thought of as advancing the ball downfield towards the end zone. Or at least, the red zone.

Or at least, a few inches away from your own end zone. This is why we go out to rallies and scream at the protestors on the other side. It’s nothing less than political trench warfare.

Lots of energy spent. Lots of loss. Little gained.

So we want to see our opponent’s downfall. But therein lies the moral quandary. How badly must the opponent suffer?

And for moral conservatives, Christian or otherwise, when does the lust for strategic gain cross into the overreach, the overzealous, even the immoral?

This brings up the other hand of the weighing process. Does possible criminality justify or rationalize our bloodlust? Do our political opponents deserve to lose their liberty, because they disagree with us?

This, my friends, is the practical, logical outcome of the chase for a scalp.

Wasserman-Schultz may personally face criminal prosecution. Her risk comes from several factors.

The federal criminal statutes are broad, and their interpretation is growing in scope to cover an ever-widening array of conduct. The “overcriminalization” trend has gotten increasing notice over the last two decades (perhaps an undesirable symptom of 9/11 and its rationalization for expanded government power), and bipartisan recognition on both sides of the congressional aisle. This trend can easily ensnare Wasserman-Schultz.

The easiest angles to pursue would be obstruction of justice and false statements. These are crimes often charged when an underlying “real” crime cannot be easily proven and the government decides to undercharge and press to prosecute on a simpler (if less deserving) charge.

Obstruction? This can cover lots of conduct taken to impede an ongoing investigation, particularly when the target (today, DWS, or her staff, or all of them) knew of the investigation.

And false statements? This is a related criminal activity, most notoriously used to prosecute Martha Stewart in the wake of insufficient evidence of her insider trading. This can cover any statement made to any government official. This is a broad statute.

When you see how broadly the criminal laws can be applied, you’ll understand why the most terrifying word in Washington is “investigation.”

Throw in the political ambitions or career resume-building of young lawyers trying to use a name prosecution — a “get” in those circles — to later become partners or even rainmakers in powerful law firms, and the ingredients are there for an investigation that will zealously pursue its prey, in search of enough evidence not to indict, but to convict (and ideally, to secure a plea deal).

In light of how these laws can be stretched and even abused, conservatives should stop and ask themselves whether this is a proper use of the fearsome power of the state.

Politics often spark efforts by the zealous to use the immense prosecutorial power of an increasingly overreaching federal government. Conservatives should show restraint and maturity, and ask themselves: Are we sure this is our side?

Conservative corporate lawyer, commentator, blockchain technology patent holder and entrepreneur. Headquartered in a red light district in the middle of a deep blue People's Republic.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Distant Smoke

    August 1, 2017 at 6:39 am

    So DJT should be impeached for having the nerve to be elected President, but we shouldn’t prosecute DWS for treason because it’s a waste of time and energy? This is crazy.

  2. OptimumAnon

    August 2, 2017 at 11:08 am

    Agree with Distant Smoke. Our leadership is rarely held accountable as is (blagojevich in 2009, being the last I recall), and given the extremes of this political climate and the CLEAR crimes and coverups at play, prosecution should be a given. No one should be above the law, and it is clear that any person off the street would have been jailed for similar offenses without delay.

    To wit, how many devices need to be smashed with a hammer while under subpoena, and how many hard drives need to be erased with bleach bit before someone is jailed? Innocent people do not destroy evidence, and the destruction itself is a crime as well. Without accountability at the top here, the people will revolt. There cannot be a separate set of laws for leadership and the common civilian. Period.

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Democrats

SNL takes on Al Franken

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SNL takes on Al Franken

The good news (if such things ever come from Saturday Night Live) is that for the second weekend in a row, they took a couple of jabs at Democrats. Of course, they had to maintain their liberal credibility by hammering conservatives much harder in their “Weekend Update” segment.

Co-host Colin Jost pointed out the obvious:

“Sure, this was taken before Franken ran for public office, but it was also taken after he was a sophomore in high school,” Jost said. “It’s pretty hard to be like , ‘Oh Come on, he didn’t know better  He was only 55.”

Source: Townhall

Saturday Night Live Lampoons Sen. Al Franken

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/timothymeads/2017/11/19/saturday-night-live-lampoons-sen-al-franken-n2411622Referring to a picture of Al Franken groping a sleeping Leeann Tweeden, the host said:

“Senator Al Franken is being accused of sexual misconduct on a 2006 U.S.O. Tour by Leann Tweeden, who posted this photo of Franken apparently groping her breasts while she was asleep. Now, I know this photo looks bad, but remember it also is bad.”

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Democrats

Roy Moore must pass the Cemetery Gates, but Al Franken is a progressive so he is OK

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I would be cool with both Roy Moore and Al Franken walking passed the cemetery gates, but it should not surprise any moral-minded freedom liberty loving conservative that Franken gets a pass.  Even from the Great Mitch McConnell.  Yes, there is a double standard, but what matters is that the progressives and their collaborators continue to maintain power in our government.

Shame that its only Moore that must pass those dreaded gates of the dead.

Meanwhile, we have to push for Article V and/or new political party to take the place of the do nothing Republican Party.  Otherwise, it will have to take a civil war to get our freedom back and I don’t know if we are strong enough for even that.  Don’t get me started about Edward “Ted” Kennedy who truly got away with murder.  At least it kept Ted out of the White House, but I doubt would have been the case now.  What matters is that we create the kingdom on Earth and prove God a liar and that we don’t need his help or his forgiveness or above all honor his ‘oppressive’ law.

Until further notice, I stand by Roy Moore.


Levin: Shameless Dems are trying to bury the sexual abuse allegations against Franken

https://www.conservativereview.com/articles/levin-shameless-dems-are-trying-to-bury-the-franken-allegations?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_content=111717levin-franken-ethics-committee&utm_campaign=crfbDespite the countless and vocal calls from Washington for Roy Moore to drop out of the Alabama Senate race, it is virtual silence on the Franken-resignation front. The only seeming consensus from his colleagues and party leaders is that Franken should go before the Senate Ethics Committee.

“Between 2007 and 2016, the Senate Ethics Committee imposed zero sanctions against anyone. Zero — despite 613 allegations and 75 preliminary investigations. Zero,” Shapiro wrote Thursday.

What all 46 Democratic senators (and two independents) say about Al Franken

https://www.conservativereview.com/articles/what-all-46-democratic-senators-say-about-al-frankenNot a single Democrat has called for Al Franken to step down or be expelled from the Senate despite photographic evidence that backs up Leeann Tweeden’s allegation that Franken groped her breasts while she was sleeping and despite her claim that Franken forced his tongue down her throat.

 

 

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Democrats

Menendez gets a mistrial

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Menendez gets a mistrial

Democrats on Capitol Hill and around the nation would be celebrating a good day as Senator Bob Menendez was granted a mistrial in his federal corruption case. The news was relegated to page-2 news as his colleague, Senator Al Franken, was accused of sexual misconduct.

Reports of a hopelessly deadlocked jury mean the Senator will likely not have to go to trial again following 11 weeks of drama in Newark, NJ. He and co-defendant Salomon Melgen weren’t acquitted, but the mistrial declaration means the government would have to rebuild their case to justify another go-around. Quotes from jurors indicate they didn’t have much of a case, allegedly 10 of the 12 jurors favored acquittal.

“When the prosecution rested…in my gut I was like, that was it, that’s all they had?” said Ed Norris, a 49-year-old juror from Roxbury Township.

Further Reading

Sen. Bob Menendez warns opponents after mistrial: ‘I won’t forget’

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/sen-bob-menendez-warns-opponents-after-mistrial-i-wont-forget/article/2640943New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez said Thursday he would not forget those seeking to benefit from his downfall after his federal trial for allegedly taking bribes ended in a mistrial.

“To those who were digging my political grave so that they could jump into my seat, I know who you are and I won’t forget you,” the Democrat said at a press conference.

Judge declares mistrial in Senator Bob Menendez federal corruption trial

http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/11/bob_menendez_mistrial_federal_corruption_case_guilty_not_guilty.htmlMenendez was visibly emotional as he spoke to reporters following the conclusion of the trial. “The way this case started was wrong. The way it was investigated was wrong. The way it was prosecuted was wrong,” proclaimed the senator, thanking 12 jurors “who saw through the government’s false claims and used their Jersey common sense to reject it.”

In a statement, the Justice Department also thanked the jury, and said only “the department will carefully consider next steps in this important matter and report to the court at the appropriate time.”

As Sexual Assault Gains Attention, the Left’s Silence on Bob Menendez Is Deafening

http://dailysignal.com/2017/11/15/sexual-assault-gains-attention-lefts-silence-bob-menendez-deafening/A new Media Research Center analysis reported that ABC, CBS, and NBC devoted 40 times more of their morning and evening TV newscast coverage this past week to Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore’s alleged sexual assault accusers than to the ongoing federal trial of one of the Democrats’ most powerful, visible, and entrenched figures on Capitol Hill.

Four years ago, when the FBI raided the Florida home of Democratic donor and eye doctor Salomon Melgen, Menendez suddenly remembered that he had failed to pay back his “hermano” $60,000 for private jet flights to the Caribbean—where Melgen owns a tony home in the private Casa de Campo resort.

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