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If Trump pivots, it’s the end for the GOP

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Last week was arguably the most tumultuous the Republican Party has seen in recent history. Not only did they fail to repeal Obamacare as they’ve promised for seven years, but they also suffered insult after insult from the leader of the free world.

No, I’m not just referring to the Tweets, though there were many. His actions spoke volumes. He fired Reince Priebus. Say what you will about Priebus’ leadership and politics (and I’ve said plenty in the past), but what cannot be denied is that fact that under his watch the GOP gained the House, Senate, and White House. Granted, they did so based upon the aforementioned Obamacare repeal promises, but Priebus was a steady hand guiding the ship and raising a ton of money as RNC Chair. As Chief of Staff, he tried to bring the same brand of Establishment Republican calm to the tempest of the White House and failed to impress his boss.

His replacement, Anthony Scaramucci, is about as liberal as Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner.

Then, there’s Jeff Sessions. Again, his conservative bonafides can be questioned, particularly when it comes to his love for civil asset forfeiture, but he has been universally respected by his colleagues as a proper party-line Republican for decades. Now, he’s being chucked under the bus repeatedly by his boss. What’s a little less appreciated in Trump’s various insults directed towards the GOP is that he chose to attack Sessions first in an interview with the NY Times and then potentially leaked damaging information about Sessions to the Washington Post, two publications that have failed to hide their scorn for the GOP.

With all of this sudden shift towards Democratic havens and bringing in liberal staff, some are speculating that Trump may be intending to leave the Republican Party altogether and form an independent White House.

Two articles in particular point to the possibility. Both highlight the disaster it could be for the floundering party. Rod Dreher gives a quick pros-and-cons analysis of the possibility while Ed Willing goes more in-depth. The bottom line is this:

If Donald Trump breaks from the GOP, the party is essentially done for the foreseeable future.

It’s not that Republicans won’t turn on him. Many will. However, even if his loyalists account for 10% of the vote (and it’s likely a bit higher than that), the GOP will not be able to sustain. They’ll suffer massive losses in Congress and could start losing state control before the next Presidential election.

This new “party,” if that’s what he intends to form, will be left-leaning in many regards with a splash of alt-right ideology to keep his most loyal fans on board. Fair trade, heavy taxes on the wealthy, and social liberalism would get mixed with a wall and a travel ban to form the ugliest and most ineffective policy combination the nation has ever seen.

Keep in mind that I’m no fan of the GOP. I believe that the Federalist Party is the future for the nation, but I’m concerned that the damage Trump could do by empowering the Democrats would only make our job harder. I don’t cheer on the Republicans because the majority of the ones in Washington DC push for bigger government, but they tend to do slightly less damage than the Democrats. When the Federalist Party is ready to make an impact, I’d prefer to have fewer problems to address. If Trump makes this move, problems will escalate rapidly.

Whether he’s planning on breaking away or simply continuing the turmoil at its current semi-insane level, the nation is going to continue to hurt as a result. Between an ineffective GOP Congress and a haywire White House, very little is being accomplished. It’s prompting the Federalist Party to accelerate growth and be ready for races sooner rather than later.

Christian, husband, father. EIC, NOQ Report. Co-Founder, the Federalist Party. Just a normal guy who will no longer sit around while the country heads in the wrong direction.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Bryan Woodsmall

    July 30, 2017 at 12:20 pm

    If Trump makes this turn, I think he would also stay consistent on climate change, energy, and maybe deregulation in general. This would help him keep some of his support, and would be good for the country. I have to think he would also try to stay socially conservative enough to keep his evangelical supporters on board. They (embarrassingly) have been among his strongest supporters.

    The more heat he gets from the investigations and other controversies the more loyal he will stay to evangelicals, in my opinion, because those evangelical supporters are a key chunk of support for him. In exchange for defending things that we shouldn’t be defending and praising a leader we shouldn’t be praising we get some good policies. Personally, I don’t think it is a good trade, and I will not be participating. Evangelicals are losing credibility and therefore influence because of the enthusiastic support some within our ranks have shown for this president.

  2. OkieHomemaker

    July 31, 2017 at 12:57 pm

    Please tell the Federalist Party to change their name. We don’t want Federalists. We want Anti-Federalists. Who, in the party, didn’t read their history???

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Federalists

How to debate your political enemies… and win

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How to debate your political enemies and win

It’s no secret that we live in a world of political division. Not only are liberals at war with conservatives, but both sides of the political spectrum are at war with themselves.

While my preference is unity, it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen anytime soon, judging by social media. Since that’s the case, then people need to at least, learn how to debate effectively.

Here are four things to remember before getting into your next political debate:

1. Stop letting your opponent control the language

Until pregnant, pro-choice women start having fetus showers on a regular basis, it’s not a “fetus”. It’s a baby.

Until guns jump off the table, run down the street, and start shooting people on their own, it’s not “gun violence”. It’s just violence.

When you let your opponent control the language, you let them control the debate. You allow them the opportunity to soften their position through less controversial verbiage, making their position sound almost reasonable.

Call a spade a spade. Catering to politically correct double-speak is a form of soft tyranny.

2. Know your opponent and their tactics, then call them on it

I learned this one watching Ben Shapiro take on Piers Morgan in an interview regarding the 2nd Amendment. Ben had researched Piers’ tactics, and at the beginning of the interview, called him out on them, pointing out that Morgan has a tendency to resort to name-calling vitriol, ad hominem attacks, and attempts to paint his opponent as low intellect Neanderthals, whenever he ran out of talking points to support his position. Shapiro went on to say that he trusted that Morgan wouldn’t engage in those same tactics in their debate.

Morgan was instantly taken aback, batted his eyelashes innocently, and went into full denial mode. The interview went smoothly for a while, with Morgan refraining from his typical tactics, but true to form, reverted to his normal attacks when Shapiro had him backed into a corner, giving him the ammo he needed to point out that he was correct in his initial assessment of Morgan’s tactics.

I’ve implemented this strategy in many debates, and without fail, it’s been effective.

3. Don’t go on defense

It’s inevitable. In any debate, on any topic, your opponent is going to spend the bulk of their time, telling you why your position is wrong and why you’re a bad person for holding it. All too often, I see good people take this bait and retreat into a mode of defending themselves, rather than defending their position, or going on offense against their opponents position.

It’s a natural reaction to try and defend your character, morality or ethics when they come under attack. However, the second you do, you’ve just handed the debate to your opponent.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve been called a “gun nut that doesn’t care about children”. Until I learned the tactic of not taking that bait, my reaction was usually “I am not a gun nut and I love kids”. Now, my reaction is “If being a proponent of the basic, human right to self defense, not only for me, but for the protection of children, makes me a ‘nut,’ so be it. What I think is nutty is being opposed to those things.”

Guess which one of those reactions is more effective in winning the debate.

4. Don’t allow deflection

When people are losing a debate, they tend to drift into side topics. It’s not unusual for a pro-abortion advocate to drift into healthcare as a whole, or for a gun control advocate to drift into government provided “safety”.

Don’t follow people down these rabbit holes. Drag them right back out, and force them to stay on the topic of hand. The moment you start following them is the moment you’ve given them control to lead you to separate topics, control the debate, and muddy the waters of the original topic.

Debate is a healthy thing when done right. It’s done right when the right strategies are applied. So engage, but engage to win. I assume your position is worth it.

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Politics

What makes a Statesman?

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What makes a Statesman

According to Merriam-Webster dictionary a statesman is defined by two definitions.

1: one versed in the principles or art of government; especially: one actively engaged in conducting the business of a government or in shaping its policies

2: a wise, skillful, and respected political leader

Sadly, by Merriam-Webster’s definition many so-called statesmen are much known – and preferred to be known – by the first definition, but not so much by the second, unless of course, you are cultishly loyal to either major political party and/or its personalities.

We truly need to focus on the second definition of what makes a statesman. Someone that is truly wise, skillful, and respected. And while it does not mention it let me add a definition. Someone who fears God, does not take bribes, and truly looks out for and loves thy neighbor. How do you do that? You die to self, you cut taxes, and you truly support the people by getting the government out of the way and allow local communities and private charities to help people. You trust them and God to make a better world for themselves and the communities they live in.

Orrin Hatch may be smart and skillful. He fits more with the first definition according to Merriam-Webster, but respected political leader, Hatch is not. I give the Mormon Church credit in one aspect. They are truly great businessmen and politicians. They know the art of the deal. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints operates a for-profit business arm called Deseret Management Corporation, which operates an LDS bookstore chain, insurance/investment/retirement services, newspaper publishing including the Deseret News, and a small chain of radio stations (and one TV station) under Bonneville International Corporation; all of these stations broadcast some kind of secular format (although certain stations in the company carry the in-house LDS program “Music and the Spoken Word”). They are not like Salem Media, Educational Media Foundation (K-Love, Air1), Crawford Broadcasting, Bible Broadcasting Network, Bott Radio Network, WayMedia (Way-FM) in which these respected companies (profit and non-profit) that are owned and operated by evangelical Christians and with few exceptions broadcast either Christian Talk or some kind of Christian Music (mostly Christian AC) formats.

Mitt Romney, should he succeed Hatch, has a skill set in both the public and private realms (Hatch was a songwriter on the side). Romney is no respected political leader or businessman either. He is good at what he does, I shall grant you that.

Reference

An Unfond Farewell to Un-statesman Orrin Hatch

https://townhall.com/columnists/michellemalkin/2018/01/03/an-unfond-farewell-to-unstatesman-orrin-hatch-n2429306The longest-serving Republican senator in U.S. history announced this week that he will finally, finally, finally, finally, finally, finally, finally retire.

That’s seven “finallys” — one for each of the consecutive six-year terms Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, served. He begin his occupancy in 1976, when all phones were dumb, the 5.25-inch floppy disk was cutting-edge, the very first Apple computer went on sale for $666.66, the Concorde was flying high, O.J. Simpson was a hero, Blake Shelton was a newborn, the first MRI was still a blueprint, and I was a gap-toothed first-grader wearing corduroy bell-bottoms crushing on Davy Jones.

Mitt Romney is the last person we need in the Senate

https://www.conservativereview.com/articles/mitt-romney-last-person-need-senate/Raise your hand if you’re excited for Senator Romney!

Democrats tend to elevate to high positions those who most effectively and aggressively champion their values. Republicans, on the other hand, tend to champion those who most effectively promote the values of the other side. Example number ten million? Mitt Romney’s likely run for Senate.

Mitt Romney: Not the senator we need, but the senator we deserve

https://www.conservativereview.com/articles/mitt-romney-not-senator-need-senator-deserve/Since I’m the guy who supposedly cost Willard Mitt Romney the Iowa caucuses twice, I suppose I’m expected to have some hot take at the ready about his prospective bid for U.S. Senate — a real teeth-gnasher about the human Etch-a-Sketch returning to surprise us every day with where he (temporarily) stands on any given issue.

Except I don’t, because as the great prophet Phil Collins once sang, “I don’t care any more-wore.”

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News

Romney swipes at Trump over ‘s***hole’ comment

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Romney swipes at Trump over shole comment

Some celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day by honoring the civil rights leader. Others just take the day off. Potential (nearly certain) Senate candidate Mitt Romney used his national holiday to take a swipe at President Trump’s comments about “s***hole countries” that were reported last week.

My Take

It was a strange play. It’s obviously a populist view that goes against a semi-populist President who sees his greatest divergent from American culture in his opinions about race and immigration, but for Romney to tie it into MLK Day is a little odd. There is plenty of time to demonstrate he would be a candidate who opposes the President. There’s only one strategic reason to do it now: If he intends to support the President in the near future.

By Tweeting this, Romney could be doing two things to help his cause. First, he builds credibility as a GOP Senator who is not beholden to the President’s every whim. Second, it gets that out of the way up front so he can turn around and talk about the good things the President is doing.

Then again, it’s probably just a politician playing politics.

Further Reading

Mitt Romney Calls Out Donald Trump With MLK Day Tweet

https://www.redstate.com/arbogast/2018/01/15/mitt-romney-calls-donald-trump-mlk-day-tweet/With Orrin Hatch (finally) retiring, the recruitment efforts to get Mitt Romney to run for that seat started immediately. With the revelation that Romney received treatment for prostate cancer over the summer, it may not be a slam dunk he runs, but if he does, Donald Trump shouldn’t expect Mitt to just get in line.

The fallout from the “s**thole” comments continue for President Trump, providing another means for him to get in his own way. The economy hums along. Corporations continue to announce wage increases and bonus payouts due to the GOP tax cut. Trump had the opportunity to get something done on DACA (which 2/3 of the country supports), and he chooses instead to yelp to the press that he’s the least racist person in the world.

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