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Keeping our representatives beholden to those they represent

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The vast majority of responses to our stance on having individual “platforms” for every candidate and representative has been positive. People like the idea of a party that is willing to hold its own people accountable to the promises they make. With that said, there have been a few concerns that must be addressed.

By far, the biggest concern is that if there is no centralized direction from the national party, we could get an extremely diverse range of perspectives from representatives. As a national party our platform is quite simple. We believe in reining in the federal government by dramatically limiting budgets, bureaucracy, and power. We hold the rights that every American is born with as sacred; the Constitution defends those rights which means our representatives must defend the Constitution. Lastly, we believe in the sanctity of human life.

Based upon the simplicity of this platform, many assume there will be too much room for interpretation. We feel strongly that there will be just the right amount of room for degrees of flexibility, but interpretations will not be skewed by whimsy or creative reckoning. For example, limiting government is as straight-forward as it needs to be. We do not fear a Federalist representative misinterpreting this in a way that makes them act to the contrary. If a bill is on their desk that truly reins in overreach, they’ll be able to recognize that just as easily as anyone else in the party would. The beauty of Federalism is that it isn’t hard to apply even with a basic understanding. We expect the understanding of those representing us to be more than basic.

Here’s the key to our stance: every state, city, community, and individual is different. We all have different needs and priorities. Today, Washington DC has become too detached from the will of the people because our national representatives are compelled to work from a national level. That’s not to say they don’t listen to their constituents, but most are only truly listening around election time and only for the purpose of determining how to win votes. In between elections, they’re willfully insulated from the real world by the partisan politics and inherent corruption of Washington DC itself.

We need our representatives to make and keep promises to their people. In some cases, “their” people may very well be the entirety of the United States. The attempted debacle of an Obamacare repeal bill currently working its way to President Trump’s desk is an example of this. In most cases, the promises made and kept by our representatives in DC should be directly influenced by the people who voted for them. This is why it’s so important for the Federalist Party to hold them accountable for their promises in the form of a clearly outlined personal platform. If a Texas Congressman says he’s going to fight against natural gas regulations to free up businesses and employees in his state, we’ll hold him accountable to that promise. If a California Congresswoman pushes forward legislation to reduce protections for illegal immigrants, it’s because she made that vow to the people in her district. That’s how Federalism works. A Congressman in New Hampshire might not care about either of these promises and likely wouldn’t list them in his platform, but he would almost certainly vote for them since they fall in line with the overarching Federalist mentality.

This works at every level. Just as a state representative has to make some decisions for the state and others for the local district, so too does a city council member often have to make promises and take actions that work on multiple scales. This is the flexibility that we desire for the party. It’s not to make it harder for the party to unify as some have suggested. It’s to allow representatives to act based upon the needs of the people they represent.

For over a century, the nation has been creeping towards more centralization. At times, it’s been lurching towards Statism at an alarming pace. Today is such a time which is why the Federalist Party must rise. We have to push for localization in order to have true accountability. Only when our representatives are beholden to the people they represent will we be able to move the country back in the right direction.

Christian, husband, father. EIC, NOQ Report. Co-Founder, the Federalist Party. Just a normal guy who will no longer sit around while the country heads in the wrong direction.

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Federalists

How to debate your political enemies… and win

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How to debate your political enemies and win

It’s no secret that we live in a world of political division. Not only are liberals at war with conservatives, but both sides of the political spectrum are at war with themselves.

While my preference is unity, it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen anytime soon, judging by social media. Since that’s the case, then people need to at least, learn how to debate effectively.

Here are four things to remember before getting into your next political debate:

1. Stop letting your opponent control the language

Until pregnant, pro-choice women start having fetus showers on a regular basis, it’s not a “fetus”. It’s a baby.

Until guns jump off the table, run down the street, and start shooting people on their own, it’s not “gun violence”. It’s just violence.

When you let your opponent control the language, you let them control the debate. You allow them the opportunity to soften their position through less controversial verbiage, making their position sound almost reasonable.

Call a spade a spade. Catering to politically correct double-speak is a form of soft tyranny.

2. Know your opponent and their tactics, then call them on it

I learned this one watching Ben Shapiro take on Piers Morgan in an interview regarding the 2nd Amendment. Ben had researched Piers’ tactics, and at the beginning of the interview, called him out on them, pointing out that Morgan has a tendency to resort to name-calling vitriol, ad hominem attacks, and attempts to paint his opponent as low intellect Neanderthals, whenever he ran out of talking points to support his position. Shapiro went on to say that he trusted that Morgan wouldn’t engage in those same tactics in their debate.

Morgan was instantly taken aback, batted his eyelashes innocently, and went into full denial mode. The interview went smoothly for a while, with Morgan refraining from his typical tactics, but true to form, reverted to his normal attacks when Shapiro had him backed into a corner, giving him the ammo he needed to point out that he was correct in his initial assessment of Morgan’s tactics.

I’ve implemented this strategy in many debates, and without fail, it’s been effective.

3. Don’t go on defense

It’s inevitable. In any debate, on any topic, your opponent is going to spend the bulk of their time, telling you why your position is wrong and why you’re a bad person for holding it. All too often, I see good people take this bait and retreat into a mode of defending themselves, rather than defending their position, or going on offense against their opponents position.

It’s a natural reaction to try and defend your character, morality or ethics when they come under attack. However, the second you do, you’ve just handed the debate to your opponent.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve been called a “gun nut that doesn’t care about children”. Until I learned the tactic of not taking that bait, my reaction was usually “I am not a gun nut and I love kids”. Now, my reaction is “If being a proponent of the basic, human right to self defense, not only for me, but for the protection of children, makes me a ‘nut,’ so be it. What I think is nutty is being opposed to those things.”

Guess which one of those reactions is more effective in winning the debate.

4. Don’t allow deflection

When people are losing a debate, they tend to drift into side topics. It’s not unusual for a pro-abortion advocate to drift into healthcare as a whole, or for a gun control advocate to drift into government provided “safety”.

Don’t follow people down these rabbit holes. Drag them right back out, and force them to stay on the topic of hand. The moment you start following them is the moment you’ve given them control to lead you to separate topics, control the debate, and muddy the waters of the original topic.

Debate is a healthy thing when done right. It’s done right when the right strategies are applied. So engage, but engage to win. I assume your position is worth it.

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Politics

What makes a Statesman?

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What makes a Statesman

According to Merriam-Webster dictionary a statesman is defined by two definitions.

1: one versed in the principles or art of government; especially: one actively engaged in conducting the business of a government or in shaping its policies

2: a wise, skillful, and respected political leader

Sadly, by Merriam-Webster’s definition many so-called statesmen are much known – and preferred to be known – by the first definition, but not so much by the second, unless of course, you are cultishly loyal to either major political party and/or its personalities.

We truly need to focus on the second definition of what makes a statesman. Someone that is truly wise, skillful, and respected. And while it does not mention it let me add a definition. Someone who fears God, does not take bribes, and truly looks out for and loves thy neighbor. How do you do that? You die to self, you cut taxes, and you truly support the people by getting the government out of the way and allow local communities and private charities to help people. You trust them and God to make a better world for themselves and the communities they live in.

Orrin Hatch may be smart and skillful. He fits more with the first definition according to Merriam-Webster, but respected political leader, Hatch is not. I give the Mormon Church credit in one aspect. They are truly great businessmen and politicians. They know the art of the deal. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints operates a for-profit business arm called Deseret Management Corporation, which operates an LDS bookstore chain, insurance/investment/retirement services, newspaper publishing including the Deseret News, and a small chain of radio stations (and one TV station) under Bonneville International Corporation; all of these stations broadcast some kind of secular format (although certain stations in the company carry the in-house LDS program “Music and the Spoken Word”). They are not like Salem Media, Educational Media Foundation (K-Love, Air1), Crawford Broadcasting, Bible Broadcasting Network, Bott Radio Network, WayMedia (Way-FM) in which these respected companies (profit and non-profit) that are owned and operated by evangelical Christians and with few exceptions broadcast either Christian Talk or some kind of Christian Music (mostly Christian AC) formats.

Mitt Romney, should he succeed Hatch, has a skill set in both the public and private realms (Hatch was a songwriter on the side). Romney is no respected political leader or businessman either. He is good at what he does, I shall grant you that.

Reference

An Unfond Farewell to Un-statesman Orrin Hatch

https://townhall.com/columnists/michellemalkin/2018/01/03/an-unfond-farewell-to-unstatesman-orrin-hatch-n2429306The longest-serving Republican senator in U.S. history announced this week that he will finally, finally, finally, finally, finally, finally, finally retire.

That’s seven “finallys” — one for each of the consecutive six-year terms Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, served. He begin his occupancy in 1976, when all phones were dumb, the 5.25-inch floppy disk was cutting-edge, the very first Apple computer went on sale for $666.66, the Concorde was flying high, O.J. Simpson was a hero, Blake Shelton was a newborn, the first MRI was still a blueprint, and I was a gap-toothed first-grader wearing corduroy bell-bottoms crushing on Davy Jones.

Mitt Romney is the last person we need in the Senate

https://www.conservativereview.com/articles/mitt-romney-last-person-need-senate/Raise your hand if you’re excited for Senator Romney!

Democrats tend to elevate to high positions those who most effectively and aggressively champion their values. Republicans, on the other hand, tend to champion those who most effectively promote the values of the other side. Example number ten million? Mitt Romney’s likely run for Senate.

Mitt Romney: Not the senator we need, but the senator we deserve

https://www.conservativereview.com/articles/mitt-romney-not-senator-need-senator-deserve/Since I’m the guy who supposedly cost Willard Mitt Romney the Iowa caucuses twice, I suppose I’m expected to have some hot take at the ready about his prospective bid for U.S. Senate — a real teeth-gnasher about the human Etch-a-Sketch returning to surprise us every day with where he (temporarily) stands on any given issue.

Except I don’t, because as the great prophet Phil Collins once sang, “I don’t care any more-wore.”

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News

Romney swipes at Trump over ‘s***hole’ comment

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Romney swipes at Trump over shole comment

Some celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day by honoring the civil rights leader. Others just take the day off. Potential (nearly certain) Senate candidate Mitt Romney used his national holiday to take a swipe at President Trump’s comments about “s***hole countries” that were reported last week.

My Take

It was a strange play. It’s obviously a populist view that goes against a semi-populist President who sees his greatest divergent from American culture in his opinions about race and immigration, but for Romney to tie it into MLK Day is a little odd. There is plenty of time to demonstrate he would be a candidate who opposes the President. There’s only one strategic reason to do it now: If he intends to support the President in the near future.

By Tweeting this, Romney could be doing two things to help his cause. First, he builds credibility as a GOP Senator who is not beholden to the President’s every whim. Second, it gets that out of the way up front so he can turn around and talk about the good things the President is doing.

Then again, it’s probably just a politician playing politics.

Further Reading

Mitt Romney Calls Out Donald Trump With MLK Day Tweet

https://www.redstate.com/arbogast/2018/01/15/mitt-romney-calls-donald-trump-mlk-day-tweet/With Orrin Hatch (finally) retiring, the recruitment efforts to get Mitt Romney to run for that seat started immediately. With the revelation that Romney received treatment for prostate cancer over the summer, it may not be a slam dunk he runs, but if he does, Donald Trump shouldn’t expect Mitt to just get in line.

The fallout from the “s**thole” comments continue for President Trump, providing another means for him to get in his own way. The economy hums along. Corporations continue to announce wage increases and bonus payouts due to the GOP tax cut. Trump had the opportunity to get something done on DACA (which 2/3 of the country supports), and he chooses instead to yelp to the press that he’s the least racist person in the world.

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