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Economy

We don’t need more dollars in health care. We need less government.

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Following a good showing on his first overseas trip, President Trump returned to the states and called for something that has some on the right scratching their heads. He’s wanting more dollars put towards health care.

One of the things that got the AHCA passed in the House was the decrease in spending on health care. The conservative Freedom Caucus pushed for several additions before voting for it, including the ability for states to opt-out of some of the more liberal points such as pre-existing conditions. However, the reason some gave for finally backing the bill is that it reduces overall spending on health care. What is the President asking for now?

Regardless of whether this was just a Tweet that can be disregarded as rhetoric in 140-characters-or-less or if its a sign that he really wants more money put into health care, the overarching theme is the same. Many in the GOP (and pretty much every Democrat), including the President, are missing the fundamental point that health care can only truly be fixed if the federal government systematically removes itself from the equation.

Obamacare isn’t failing because of subtle details or nuances. It’s failing because the concept behind government-mandated health care is fatally flawed. The differences between the ACA and the AHCA are so small that their cores are essentially the same. Both insert DC into an area where it simply doesn’t belong. By doing so, either will fail whether it has the letter (R) or (D) on its stamp of approval.

We don’t need more money plugged into health care. We need the massive amounts of money that are already pumped into health care focused by a consumer-driven free market. Businesses operate based upon the demands of three forces: government, consumers, and market conditions. Today, government has primacy in the equation by forcing the other two factors to be secondary. Consumers have very little impact in the equation because of mandates in both Obamacare and the current Trumpcare replacement being worked on in the Senate. As for market conditions, they are artificial because of government intervention. They will continue to be artificial if Obamacare is repealed and replaced with a variation of the AHCA.

Nearly everyone on Capitol Hill fears a full repeal for the same basic reason. They know that if it’s done right, it will work in the long term. The Democrats don’t want that because it exposes the long-con they’ve been working in DC for decades, the concept that more government is better. The Republicans don’t want that because they fear it won’t work quickly enough for them to retain power in the midterm elections. The AHCA isn’t designed to fix health care. It’s designed to pretend to fix it while mitigating fallout until election day.

As I stated in a different post:

If we systematically repeal Obamacare, we can have privatized health care once again. A replacement plan that tries to predict what will happen is foolish. Instead, we should repeal, then monitor and analyze the market. Over time, we’ll find the holes that need to be plugged. States, charities, and other organizations can fill most of these holes. Whatever is left, if anything, can fall to the federal government. This way, DC becomes the final safety net instead of being the first line of defense. That’s the way it should be in health care and a plethora of other areas.

The last thing this nation needs is more dollars redirected into health care. Those of us watching our premiums rise despite higher deductibles and worse coverage (which is a vast majority) know that there’s already “more dollars” in health care. It needs to be allocated properly through competition and the push for innovation. We can’t have the best health care in the world as the President hopes unless DC is willing to remove itself from the equation. Until then, the math will continue to fail miserably.

Christian, husband, father. EIC, NOQ Report. Co-Founder, the Federalist Party. Just a normal guy who will no longer sit around while the country heads in the wrong direction.

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Economy

The number of companies helping employees thanks to tax cuts is 164 and rising

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The number of companies helping employees thanks to tax cuts is 164 and rising

Republican tax cuts were met with instant success on the business front when the President signed them into law last month. Companies across the nation rewarded their employees and customers by passing on some of the saving they’ll get. It’s helping to push the economy even higher than it was last year.

As Nick Givas covered over at Daily Caller, the total number of companies giving back to their people is 164 and rising:

164 Companies Credit Tax Reform For Bonuses And Pay Raises

One hundred sixty-four companies have gone on record stating they gave bonuses and pay raises to employees because of the new tax reform law, according to Americans for Tax Reform. The list has been continually updated and jumped from 40 companies to 164 in 10 days, The Washington Examiner reports. The businesses include: American Airlines, AT&T,… (more…)

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Democrats

With both sides wanting more spending, Wednesday’s government funding discussions end in a stalemate

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With both sides wanting more spending Wednesdays government funding discussions end in a stalemate

There was no movement Wednesday as top Republican and Democratic leaders met at the White House to lay down their ultimatums for funding the government. With two weeks of funding still allotted, neither side seemed to be in a hurry to compromise.

One of the main sticking points was purely political. Democrats wanted something written into the spending agreement that would give certain guarantees to “Dreamers” who they say are having their futures jeopardized by President Trump’s rescinding of President Obama’s DACA executive order. This is purely for show to try to win back some of the Hispanic voters they lost in 2016 and into 2017. With the President showing more compassion for “Dreamers” than anticipated by preemptively demanding that Congress put together a permanent fix, Democrats needed to regain ground and act as if they’re the ones fighting on behalf of illegal immigrants.

Republicans were equally theatrical with their opposition to such an addition to the funding agreement, claiming they wanted to first fund the government, then address DACA before the March deadline. They could just as easily allowed something in the funding agreement, knowing they’re going to pass some variation of amnesty in the next month and a half, but instead chose to draw the red line.

The more alarming sticking point in the funding deal is that both sides want to spend more and are actually leveraging the other side’s spending increases to negotiate for spending increases of their own. Republicans want to raise defense spending. Democrats are opposed unless they can raise non-defense spending as well. In the end, it’s very likely that this “impasse” will result in both sides getting what they want: move spending across the board.

Further Reading

No spending deal after GOP, Dems meet with White House officials Wednesday

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/no-spending-deal-after-gop-dems-meet-with-white-house-officials-wednesday/article/2644897“It is important that we achieve a two-year agreement that funds our troops and provides for our national security and other critical functions of the Federal government,” the White House, House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said in a joint statement. “It also remains important that members of Congress do not hold funding for our troops hostage for immigration policy.”

“We’ve been clear about these budget priorities from the beginning and hope that further discussions will lead to an agreement soon,” they added.

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Economy

Leon H. Wolf on both major parties growing government and budgets

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Leon H Wolf on both major parties growing government and budgets

Leon H. Wolf, managing editor at The Blaze, is a big fan of limited government. Unfortunately most Republicans and all Democrats on Capitol Hill tend to favor expanding government. It’s no wonder Wolf is opposed to the way leaders in the two major parties are attempting to fund government.

In a recent article, he went after the parties and the whole process being initiated with the new year. One line in particular is worth highlighting:

“It should be noted that almost no one in either branch of government on either side is attempting to actually reduce the size of the government or its budget.”

Source: The Blaze

Republicans and Democrats open 2018 by arguing over how much to grow the size of government

http://www.theblaze.com/news/2018/01/01/republicans-and-democrats-open-2018-by-arguing-over-how-much-to-grow-the-size-of-governmentAs the holiday season comes to a close, Republicans and Democrats are opening the new year by resuming debate over a measure to fund the government through the end of 2018. The two sides failed to reach a compromise before the end of the year on such thorny issues as protection for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and funding for a wall on the southern border. But in addition to these sticking points, the two sides also appear to disagree over exactly how much the government should grow.

According to Reuters, the White House is pushing for massive increases in military spending along with a 7 percent increase in overall non-discretionary non-military spending, while Democrats are holding out for an 11 or 12 percent increase in non-discretionary spending.

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